Heroes

A restaurant told its workers if they wanted benefits, get a union. Just guess how this ends...

This trailer for "The Hand That Feeds" gives us a taste of a compelling movie about undocumented workers joining together to create real power on the job.

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Workonomics

Spoiler: After 2+ years of struggle, they were victorious, getting a union and unprecedented bargaining power against all odds.

This is about people who got together to change their lives on the job.


Folks like Mahoma López:

And Margarito López:


Gonzalo and Jorge Jiménez:

With support from members of the community such as Diego Ibañez:

And joined by fast food workers such as Pamela Flood:

Some, like Nastaran Mohit, paid a high price for their efforts:

The movie is receiving tons of acclaim (see the link below for more about that), but now the producers would love to get it released theatrically. Check out the Kickstarter to see how.

Photo by howling red on Unsplash
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