A look inside a Cambodian garment factory. There's a pretty sweet health program in there.
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Gates Foundation

When you hear about garment factories in the news, it's usually because something went wrong.

After all, they don't exactly have the best reputation. So when I recently went on a Learning Tour to Cambodia with the nonprofit organization CARE, I was very intrigued when I saw that our itinerary included a trip to the Levi Strauss factory in Phnom Penh. What was that going to be like?

As eye-opening as I'd imagined.


There was so much to see (and probably a lot I didn't see). There were parts that felt straight out of a news segment, but there was one part that probably would never make headlines.

The factory is doing something really cool that I think deserves some praise: an employee-led health education program.

This is a positive story.

We toured this factory. It was loud in there. So many machines!

In Cambodia, women make up 90% of garment industry workers.

With half a million workers in the field, you don't have to be a math whiz to understand that's a lot of women. They work super long hours (and for not enough money) to contribute to the biggest industry in Cambodia: garment-making. You probably own a pair of pants that were made there. Just sayin'.

But women and girls in Cambodia face a lot more roadblocks in life than in other parts of the world.

Despite progress in the past few years, high rates of poverty, maternal mortality, human trafficking, violence, and poor health and education access still hinder Cambodia's development. And when you take into account that 40% of Cambodia's children under 5 years old suffer from chronic malnutrition, it's easy to see that kids aren't getting off to a good start in life either. It's a cycle that's hard to break.

Pich Navy is a garment worker whose daughter has been sick way too much.

We're talking multiple times a month, with stomach bugs, diarrhea, you know ... the miserable, messy stuff. And if caring for a sick kid isn't already hard enough, it can be crushing for a parent's job stability and paycheck.

Open wide, it's breakfast.

But when Pich started listening to her coworkers talk about hygiene and sanitation over their lunch break, it sorta changed everything.

This is from one of the education sessions I was able to witness.

CARE has been working with garment factories (like the Levi Strauss one!) to find ways to empower women who have lacked the resources and education they need to make decisions about their own health and well-being.

What's especially cool is how they set it up. The CARE Cambodian team helps to train some garment workers on topics of health and hygiene — things like birth control (did you know a lot of the women are using IUDs? Pretty neat), condoms, food groups, how to keep things sanitary, how to take care of yourself, HIV/AIDS, and even how to be a better communicator in life.

Then, the trained employees turn around and help teach their coworkers.

Peer educators are giving their coworkers the tools to live healthier, better lives.

Peer educators go over their lesson for the day at the Levi Strauss factory. I'm pretty sure this was on birth spacing, but I also can't read Khmer.

The sessions usually take place around lunchtime, and they've been a win-win for all involved. Healthier employees means more productive employees — at work and at home — and that's becoming apparent to the workers and the factory.

The peer model is super smart and sustainable, too.

There's a lot more trust in peer-to-peer teaching than when a superior storms in and tells you what to do.

Pich's daughter doesn't get sick all the time anymore, and it's because her coworkers taught her how to properly wash her food and practice better hygiene.

Since she has been going to the health education sessions at work, Pich has been able to take her new knowledge of nutrition and use it at home with her family. So awesome.

Programs like this are a perfect example of how we can work together toward a healthier and smarter world.

For people who already know why you wash a vegetable before eating or how to properly wash your body to stay clean, this kind of teaching might not seem like a big deal. But in places where access to education is still limited and a lot of these life skills are never taught -— it's huge.

And I understand that garment factories are far from ideal places to work, but this is a step in the right direction. Hopefully more factories will recognize the benefits of focusing on employee health.

It's all about taking one step at a time.

See how the U.S. and Australian governments are contributing:

The Hill/Twitter

It was a mere three weeks ago that President Biden announced that the U.S. would have enough vaccine supply to cover every adult American by the end of July. At the time, that was good news.

Today, he's bumped up that date by two full months.

That's great news.

In his announcement to the nation, Biden outlined the updated process for getting the country immunized against COVID-19.


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We're redefining what normal means in these uncertain times, and although this is different for all of us, love continues to transform us for the better.

Love is what united Marie-Claire and David Archbold, who met while taking a photography class. "We went into the darkroom to see what developed," they joke—and after a decade of marriage, they know firsthand the deep commitment and connection romantic love requires.

All photos courtesy of Marie-Claire and David Archbold

However, their relationship became even sweeter when they adopted James: a little boy with a huge heart.

In the United States alone, there are roughly 122,000 children awaiting adoption according to the latest report from the U.S Department of Health and Human Services. While the goal is always for a child to be parented by and stay with their biological family, that is not always a possibility. This is where adoption offers hope—not only does it create new families, it gives birth parents an avenue through which to see their child flourish when they are not able to parent. For the right families, it's a beautiful thing.

The Archbolds knew early on that adoption was an option for them. David has three daughters from a previous marriage, but knowing their family was not yet complete, the couple embarked on a two-year journey to find their match. When the adoption agency called and told them about James, they were elated. From the moment they met him, the Archbolds knew he was meant to be part of their family. David locked eyes with the brown-eyed baby and they stared at each other in quiet wonder for such a long time that the whole room fell silent. "He still looks at me like that," said David.

The connection was mutual and instantaneous—love at first sight. The Archbolds knew that James was meant to be a part of their family. However, they faced significant challenges requiring an even deeper level of commitment due to James' medical condition.

James was born with congenital hyperinsulinism, a rare condition that causes his body to overproduce insulin, and within 2 months of his birth, he had to have surgery to remove 90% of his pancreas. There was a steep learning curve for the Archbolds, but they were already in love, and knew they were committed to the ongoing care that'd be required of bringing James into their lives. After lots of research and encouragement from James' medical team, they finally brought their son home.

Today, three-year-old James is thriving, filled with infectious joy that bubbles over and touches every person who comes in contact with him. "Part of love is when people recognize that they need to be with each other," said his adoptive grandfather. And because the Archbolds opted for an open adoption, there are even more people to love and support James as he grows.

This sweet story is brought to you by Sumo Citrus®. This oversized mandarin is celebrated for its incredible taste and distinct looks. Sumo Citrus is super-sweet, enormous, easy-to-peel, seedless, and juicy without the mess. Fans of the fruit are obsessive, stocking up from January to April when Sumo Citrus is in stores. To learn more, visit sumocitrus.com and @sumocitrus.

You know that feeling you get when you walk into a classroom and see someone else's stuff on your desk?

OK, sure, there are no assigned seats, but you've been sitting at the same desk since the first day and everyone knows it.

So why does the guy who sits next to you put his phone, his book, his charger, his lunch, and his laptop in the space that's rightfully yours? It's annoying!

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via ABC News

Julia Tinetti, 31, and Cassandra Madison, 32, first met in 2013 while working at The Russian Lady, a bar in New Haven, Connecticut, and the two immediately hit it off.

"We started hanging out together. We went out for drinks, dinner," Julia told "Good Morning America." "I thought she was cool. We hit it off right away," added Cassandra

The two also shared a strong physical resemblance and matching tattoos of the flag of the Dominican Republic. They had a bond that was so unique, even their coworkers thought there must be something more happening.

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