6 ways America might look different 83 years after leaving the Paris Agreement.

With the Trump administration reportedly set to leave the Paris climate agreement, it's time to focus on what's really important: tourism!

Since the rollout of Trump's Muslim ban, hotels, airlines, and destinations are already losing millions as international travelers avoid the United States. But by leaving the Paris agreement, under which signatories agree to limit global temperature rise to two degrees Celsius, the administration is ensuring that the tourism industry of 2100 will boom like never before!

President Trump may be scaring away visitors now, but America will look like a completely different country by then. A mere 76-80 years after Trump is gone, America will deliver a whole new climate change-affected experience for the adventurous tourist to enjoy!


We might be too lazy to change the slogans, but nature is probably going to change the views a whole lot.

Get pumped. Here's what the rebrand might look like:

1. Visit beautiful Miami!

Your grandma's old condo is in there somewhere. Photo via iStock.

Without the concerted effort to curb carbon emissions and reduce temperature rise mandated by the Paris Agreement, the ensuing six- to 10-foot sea level rise by 2100 would probably sink much of the Florida city.

On the plus side, more party yachts and deep sea fishing!

2. Experience nature's defrosted majesty at Montana's Glacier National Park!

Photo via iStock.

The park's signature glaciers have already shrunk 40% over the past 50 years, and the more global temperature rises, the more that trend is expected to accelerate.

Why haul your family all the way to Montana for some boring millennia-old ice sheets when you could travel thousands of miles to see ... just some regular mountains!

3. Explore the magnificent, colorful coral reefs of Key West!

Photo via iStock.

Ocean warming has already bleached 91% of the Great Barrier Reef. And if it can happen in Australia, there's no reason why it couldn't happen here too.

Turns out, it already is — down in the Florida Keys! And more to come as the temperature rises!

We're #1! We're #1!

4. See the majestic swimming ponies of Assateague Island!

Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images.

The famous Maryland/Virginia horse sanctuary is one of many eastern barrier islands that could be doomed by rising sea levels. Every year, the wild herd swims from Assateague Island to Chincoteague Island, a tourist event that draws 50,000 people to the small island community.

If sea levels continue rising, the ponies might have to adjust to longer swims — but the island's kayaking industry will boom!

5. Roam the rolling wheat fields of Kansas!

Part of a complete breakfast. Photo via iStock.

A 2015 Kansas State University study found that wheat production will likely decline 6% for every degree Celsius of temperature rise.

With more of the state's fertile farmland decaying into hazy, spooky wastelands, Halloween travel to the state is sure to explode!

6. Get up close and personal with history at Mar-a-Lago!

Photo via iStock.

Along with the rest of southern Florida, a double-digit sea level rise could reduce President Trump's favorite play place to damp, moldy rubble.

If ruined monuments to civilizational hubris rake in the bucks in Greece and Rome, imagine how well they'll do in a country that really knows how to cash in!

While the window to stop the president from withdrawing from the Paris Agreement appears to be closing (for now), it hasn't happened yet!

Which means if you like America as is, there's still time to try to preserve it for your kids and grandkids.

Photo by Astrid Riecken/Getty Images.

For those of us who aren't in office, one of the most effective ways to help save the planet is to let those who are know how we feel about the choices they make.

According to an Associated Press report, 22 Republican senators are pressuring Trump to leave the accord. If you're represented by one of them, you can give them a call to try to change their mind.

If you're represented by Sen. Lindsay Graham, Rep. Vern Buchanan, or any of the other Republican elected officials who support staying in the agreement, call them and tell them to keep doing what they're doing.

Even if the agreement goes down, all won't be lost right away. Here's some hopeful reading that describes the best-case scenario to a Paris Agreement-less U.S. — a massive grassroots backlash that leads to more renewable energy innovation and a greener future. And cities and states are stepping in to enact tougher emissions rules where the federal government is stepping back.

But in the meantime, get calling.

The stakes are too high to hope for the best.

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

Via Pexels and Sean MacEntee / Flickr

Apple has taken a huge step towards protecting children by announcing its new plan to scan iPhone photos for images of child abuse. The company will use a "neural match" system to scan photographs and if anything looks suspicious, a human at Apple will be notified to review the images and contact the authorities if necessary.

According to Apple, the new system will "continuously scan photos that are stored on a US user's iPhone and have also been uploaded to its iCloud back-up system."

The system is designed to protect users' privacy by scanning photos without making private communications readable by the company.

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