5-year-old boys are given the same restrictions girls face around the world. They're not pleased.
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Gates Foundation

You never know what will come out of a 5-year-old's mouth.

Kids can be unpredictable little creatures. Their imaginations run wild, and they can be so curious, so fearless, and so brutally honest that it catches you off guard.

They can also be so on point.


A group of kindergarten boys were asked some important questions.

Global Citizen went to a classroom in Brooklyn, New York, to get the perspective of some young boys. It started out fairly normal:

"What do you want to be when you grow up?"



Solid choices, boys. Stay in school. GIFs via Global Citizen.

But then it took a turn. The questions that followed put them in a different situation — a situation that many young girls face around the world. They flipped the "roles" of boys and girls:

"What if I told you that only your sister was allowed to play football and learn math and become a president. And you weren't allowed to do that because you are a boy?"



Yeah, that's not fair. Thanks for noticing! GIFs via Global Citizen.

This social experiment touches on an important point: Millions of girls aren't allowed to do the things boys can do simply because they're girls.

According to The Girl Effect, 31 million girls of primary school age around the world aren't in school. 17 million of them are expected never to enter.

There are many reasons for this: They are forced into child marriages, they become young mothers, they are expected to work and to be at home, their culture doesn't see them as equal to boys, and more. Whatever the case, this gender divide has serious consequences for our world.

What kind of consequences? In Bangladesh, for example, $69 billion potentially could be added to the national income if just one million girls were able to delay marriage and becoming young mothers. $69 billion. And that's just one country.

Restrictions on girls keep them from reaching their full potential — but we're seeing progress.

While the numbers above might seem a bit overwhelming, we are seeing improvements in the treatment of girls and women through the work of many organizations and governments and by our next generation being pretty dang inclusive.

When boys like the ones in this kindergarten class view girls as their equals, it's a step toward a more equal world!

Right on, little man. I like where your head's at. GIF via Global Citizen.

These boys think girls should have the same opportunities as they do.

If you do too, consider sharing this or taking action with Global Citizen.

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

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Vanna White appeared on "The Price Is Right" in 1980.

Vanna White has been a household name in the United States for decades, which is kind of hilarious when you consider how she gained her fame and fortune. Since 1982, the former model and actress has made millions walking back and forth turning letters (and later simply touching them—yay technology) on the game show "Wheel of Fortune."

That's it. Walking back and forth in a pretty evening gown, flipping letters and clapping for contestants. More on that job in a minute…

As a member of Gen X, television game shows like "Wheel of Fortune" and "The Price is Right" send me straight back to my childhood. Watching this clip from 1980 of Vanna White competing on "The Price is Right" two years before she started turning letters on "Wheel of Fortune" is like stepping into a time machine. Bob Barker's voice, the theme music, the sound effects—I swear I'm home from school sick, lying on the ugly flowered couch with my mom checking my forehead and bringing me Tang.

This video has it all: the early '80s hairstyles, a fresh-faced Vanna White and Bob Barker's casual sexism that would never in a million years fly today.

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