A 5-foot-tall artist makes adorable cartoons on the perks of being short
via Three Under The Rain / Instagram

Brisa is the the illustrator of Three Under the Rain, a comic series on Instagram about her relationship with her fiance Joan and Marley, her five-year-old Labrador.

She never really considered herself an artist, but all that's changed since September 2017 when she first posted a few comics on Instagram. The first batch were called Short People Problems, about the funny situations she has to deal with as a five-foot-tall woman.

"I started with the series Short People Problems since I thought it would be fun to laugh a bit about the small daily struggles that short people have to face," she told Bored Panda.


"They were super well-received, but in the comments, there were always people saying how they didn't like being short, or how that made them feel less confident or feel that being short is a problem itself," she continued.

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So Brisa got to work on a series of illustrations touting the positive side of being pint-sized, called the Perks of Being Short. The comics aren't just a way to appease her fans, she's actually learned to love her stature.

"Now in my late twenties, I'm totally fine with my height of 152 cm, it's who I am, and I like it, but there was a time when that was not like that," she said. "So I thought it could be great to make a parallel series, focused on the perks that being below average height have."

Her illustrations have become pretty popular on Instagram, earning her over 280,000 followers and she's even launched an online store with Joan where they sells prints, clothing, and stickers featuring her artwork.

Here is the entire series of 15 Perks of Being Short that'll either help you love your height or appreciate the vertically challenged people in your life.

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

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"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

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It's amazing how even the most harrowing of decisions can be transformed with a good sense of humor.

After suffering an ankle injury during a horseback riding accident at age 13, Jo Beckwith had exhausted all other options to escape from the lingering pain from the fracture, leaving her with no better choice than to amputate.

She could have buckled under the weight of such life-altering news (no one would blame her). Instead, Jo threw a farewell party the day before her surgery. Some of her friends showed up to write a goodbye letter, fun and lighthearted messages scribbled directly onto the ankle.

@footlessjo

The messages that came into #amputation with me! #funny #therapeutic #disability #amputee #fypシ


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"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

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That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."