A 5-foot-tall artist makes adorable cartoons on the perks of being short
via Three Under The Rain / Instagram

Brisa is the the illustrator of Three Under the Rain, a comic series on Instagram about her relationship with her fiance Joan and Marley, her five-year-old Labrador.

She never really considered herself an artist, but all that's changed since September 2017 when she first posted a few comics on Instagram. The first batch were called Short People Problems, about the funny situations she has to deal with as a five-foot-tall woman.

"I started with the series Short People Problems since I thought it would be fun to laugh a bit about the small daily struggles that short people have to face," she told Bored Panda.


"They were super well-received, but in the comments, there were always people saying how they didn't like being short, or how that made them feel less confident or feel that being short is a problem itself," she continued.

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So Brisa got to work on a series of illustrations touting the positive side of being pint-sized, called the Perks of Being Short. The comics aren't just a way to appease her fans, she's actually learned to love her stature.

"Now in my late twenties, I'm totally fine with my height of 152 cm, it's who I am, and I like it, but there was a time when that was not like that," she said. "So I thought it could be great to make a parallel series, focused on the perks that being below average height have."

Her illustrations have become pretty popular on Instagram, earning her over 280,000 followers and she's even launched an online store with Joan where they sells prints, clothing, and stickers featuring her artwork.

Here is the entire series of 15 Perks of Being Short that'll either help you love your height or appreciate the vertically challenged people in your life.

via Pixabay

As people get older, social isolation and loneliness become serious problems. Many find themselves living alone for the first time after the death of a spouse. It's also difficult for older people to maintain friendships when people they've known for years become ill or pass away.

Census Bureau figures say that almost a quarter of men and nearly 46% of women over the age of 75 live alone.

But loneliness doesn't just affect those who reside by themselves. People can feel lonely when there is a discrepancy between their desired and actual relationships. To put it simply, when it comes to having a healthy social life, quality is just as important as quantity.

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