2 years in, and she hasn't gotten a raise. This open letter will tell you why.

Dear manager,

We need to talk about her. You probably know who. That analyst, designer, writer, engineer who has been at the organization for just a year or two and is already doing the work of someone several levels above her current pay band.

Or maybe she’s not even on your radar because she’s the dependable one who always delivers on time and under budget without any drama.


Despite this woman’s outstanding contributions, you haven’t promoted her or given her a raise. It’s not fair, and you know it.

Maybe you think she has to wait her turn or brush up on her soft skills and work better with others or that she simply needs more experience. But all of those things also applied to the many talented men who have rapidly advanced through the ranks of your organization.

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They had somehow not been beholden to the same constraints of "promotions are given every three years" or "but what if so-and-so gets upset that they didn’t get a raise too?"

You’ve talked a big talk about mentoring and development opportunities, but when push comes to shove, you give her the less glamorous work, the "maybe next time" speech, the completed plan decided in a separate meeting without her because it was just easier and perhaps you think she won’t make as much of a fuss about it.

Maybe you even think you’re getting away with it because she says "fine" and does a great job anyway. But do you really think that there’s no resentment in that moment? No disappointment that’s stacked on top of other disappointments that she quietly suffers? Not to mention the occasional leer, dick joke, and unwanted touching she deals with as just the day-to-day life of a woman who is killing it in a company run by men?

She’s no fool. She’s taking classes outside of work, maybe with company support but often paid out of her own pocket. She’s got side projects where she’s developing new skills and learning how to lead because outside the company walls, there’s no one who can hold her back.

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She’s got a network, and she knows what her friends at other companies make, and she has thought about what she might do if her paycheck were 20%, 30%, or 50% bigger.

It’s not too late. You can still turn this around. But you’ll have to move fast.

Back up her decisions, especially when they are right but politically uncomfortable. Get her in front of senior leadership and show off her work. Give her a real challenge and the authority and space to operate. Show her how she can do better next time when she makes a mistake instead of just being annoyed. And pay her what she’s worth with a title to match. After all, she’s grown more in the last six months than some of your team have grown in the last six years.

Do these things, and she’ll respect you and keep doing a great job. Her dedication and ingenuity will pay off in dividends for your product, your team, and your performance indicators  — making you look like a star in front of your boss and your clients.

Fail to do these things, and she will leave, probably after a big project wraps up because even in the end, she’s still responsible.

She’ll take a better role at a new organization, where she hopes to have a manager who will appreciate what she brings to the table — or maybe start her own company.

Image via iStock.

You’ll then have to write a job description, realize she was doing three people’s jobs, and spend six months interviewing candidates, hoping to find someone as good as she was only to discover that no one will accept a job at the salary you were paying her. And even after you finally hire her replacement(s), you’ll still have to spend months getting them up to speed so that they, cross your fingers, might do as good a job as she did.

But all that hasn’t happened yet. You still have time to make it right. So make it right.

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

Vanna White appeared on "The Price Is Right" in 1980.

Vanna White has been a household name in the United States for decades, which is kind of hilarious when you consider how she gained her fame and fortune. Since 1982, the former model and actress has made millions walking back and forth turning letters (and later simply touching them—yay technology) on the game show "Wheel of Fortune."

That's it. Walking back and forth in a pretty evening gown, flipping letters and clapping for contestants. More on that job in a minute…

As a member of Gen X, television game shows like "Wheel of Fortune" and "The Price is Right" send me straight back to my childhood. Watching this clip from 1980 of Vanna White competing on "The Price is Right" two years before she started turning letters on "Wheel of Fortune" is like stepping into a time machine. Bob Barker's voice, the theme music, the sound effects—I swear I'm home from school sick, lying on the ugly flowered couch with my mom checking my forehead and bringing me Tang.

This video has it all: the early '80s hairstyles, a fresh-faced Vanna White and Bob Barker's casual sexism that would never in a million years fly today.

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