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Why Putting Your Finger In Your Selfie Will Give You A Warm, Fuzzy Feeling Inside

Random acts of kindness are trending and these celebs are helping spread the word.

Why Putting Your Finger In Your Selfie Will Give You A Warm, Fuzzy Feeling Inside

The challenge: Do one small random act of kindness and post it with a selfie holding up one finger. Then, challenge your friends to do the same.

What's the point? To take the power away from bullies by creating a positive environment.


Lily Collins took the challenge. "Smiled at a stranger who looked sad. He smiled back. Spread the happy in #1Act of kindness with @bystanderrevolution. @ciara your turn!"

If you're thinking what she did was no big deal, you'd be right. Being kind is super simple, but it's powerful.

Demi Lovato is known for speaking against bullying, so she's all over this one. Here's her first random act of kindness for the 1 Act Challenge. "Bought the lady behind me a juice at Whole Foods today."

Melissa Joan Hart did it for a few people. "My random act of kindness today was that I let people cut in front of me during rush hour. I now challenge @taysprizzle and @brookeburke"

One small thing can change a person's whole day.

Can I have a "woot woot" for Jason Collins, the first professional athlete of a major sport to come out as gay? Now he's inspiring others to be stand up to bullying by spreading kindness. Here's his general shoutout to join the 1 Act Challenge.

Once isn't enough for Jenna Elfman. She's planning on doing the 1 Act Challenge every day. "I rearranged 2 overhead bins of luggage on the plane this week to help a mother of an infant who needed help with her bag."

Saving the best for last: Jeremy Grace is a high school student from Canada who lives with cerebral palsy. He knows what it's like to be different. He started "The Up High Movement" which is about spreading kindness instead of bullying. Every day, he greets hundreds of students with a high-five, and they love it. He's also joined the 1 Act Challenge.

See more celebs in this 30-second video about taking a stand against bullying by spreading kindness.

Before you say "They're just bragging" or "Why can't they do it without telling people?" you should know that these celebs are part of of a bigger anti-bullying campaign. Bystander Revolution asked them to help share the "1 Act Challenge" as a way to encourage kindness. Yes, people do kind things every day without posting, but the point here is to post. The reason? To take the power away from bullies by showing the power of kindness.

What will your "1 Act" be? Take your selfie, post it and challenge your friends. Help it catch on.

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June 26, 2020 marks the 75th anniversary of the signing of the United Nations Charter. Think of the Charter as the U.N.'s wedding vows, in which the institution solemnly promises to love and protect not one person, but the world. It's a union most of us can get behind, especially in light of recent history. We're less than seven months into 2020, and already it's established itself as a year of reckoning. The events of this year—ecological disaster, economic collapse, political division, racial injustice, and a pandemic—the complex ways those events feed into and amplify each other—have distressed and disoriented most of us, altering our very experience of time. Every passing month creaks under the weight of a decade's worth of history. Every quarantined day seems to bleed into the next.

But the U.N. was founded on the principles of peace, dignity, and equality (the exact opposite of the chaos, degradation, and inequality that seem to have become this year's ringing theme). Perhaps that's why, in its 75th year, the institution feels all the more precious and indispensable. When the U.N. proposed a "global conversation" in January 2020 (feels like thousands of years ago), many leapt to participate—200,000 within three months. The responses to surveys and polls, in addition to research mapping and media analysis, helped the U.N. pierce through the clamor—the roar of bushfire, the thunder of armed conflict, the ceaseless babble of talking heads—to actually hear what matters: our collective human voice.

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The lengths people will go to discredit a political figure—especially a Black female politician—is pretty astounding. Since Kamala Harris was announced as Joe Biden's running mate, we've seen "birther" claims that she wasn't really born in the U.S. (she was), alternating claims that she's too moderate or too radical (which can't both be true), and a claim apparently designed to be a "gotcha"—that her ancestor in Jamaica was a slave owner.

According to Politifact, the claim that Harris descends from a slave owners is likely true. In their rather lengthy fact check on her lineage, which has not revealed any definitive answers, they conclude, "It seems possible that Kamala Harris is as likely a descendant of a slave-owner as she is an enslaved person." But that doesn't mean what the folks who are using that potential descencency as a weapon seem to think it means.

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When I found out I was pregnant in October 2018, I had planned to keep the news a secret from family for a little while — but my phone seemed to have other ideas.

Within just a few hours of finding out the news, I was being bombarded with ads for baby gear, baby clothes and diapers on Facebook, Instagram and pretty much any other site I visited — be it my phone or on my computer.

Good thing my family wasn't looking over my shoulder while I was on my phone or my secret would have been ruined.

I'm certainly not alone in feeling like online ads can read your mind.

When I started asking around, it seemed like everyone had their own similar story: Brian Kelleher told me that when he and his wife met, they started getting ads for wedding rings and bridal shops within just a few weeks. Tech blogger Snezhina Piskov told me that she started getting ads for pocket projectors after discussing them in Messenger with her colleagues. Meanwhile Lauren Foley, a writer, told me she started getting ads for Happy Socks after seeing one of their shops when she got off the bus one day.

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I saw this poster today and I was going to just let it go, but then I kept feeling tugged to say something.

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While that sounds awful, it's important to know that trafficking children in the US is not all of that. I can't say it never is—I don't know. What I do know is most young trafficked children aren't sitting in a basement tied up. They have families, and someone—usually in their family—is trafficking them.

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Photo by Annie Spratt on Unsplash

Sometimes a boycott succeeds when it fails.

Although the general aim of a boycott is to hurt profits, there are times when the symbolism of a boycott gives birth to a constant, overt and irreversible new optic for a company to nurse.

When the boycott of Facebook began in June and reached its peak in July, it gathered thousands of brands who vocalized their dissatisfaction with the platform.

The boycott, under the hashtag #StopHateForProfit, was launched by civil rights groups. By July brands were fully behind removing their ad spending - resulting in a small financial dent for the social media juggernaut, but a forceful bludgeoning in the press.


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