Why Julia, a new 'Sesame Street' muppet, will be important for every family to watch.

Families everywhere are celebrating Julia, the first new "Sesame Street" muppet to go on air in a decade.

Julia — who was first introduced online in 2015 but makes her small screen debut on April 10, 2017 — will fit right in with the rest of the "Sesame Street" gang. She loves to pick flowers, she's an incredible artist, and she can remember all the words to lots of different songs.

Julia also has autism. And that's a big deal.


"We realized if we brought her to life appearing in 'Sesame Street' on air as well [as online], she would have even more impact," Sherrie Westin, an executive vice president at Sesame Workshop, told NPR.

Julia's introductory video features the orange-haired muppet singing "Sunny Days" with fellow muppet Abby Cadabby.

Julia's on screen presence will be a great learning tool for all types of families.

For parents of kids without autism, Julia provides an opportunity for them to talk about peers who may have different abilities and strengths than their own, according to "Sesame Street." For instance, it may be difficult to get Julia's attention at times (as Big Bird recently learned), but she's an excellent artist who often sees things others don't.

For parents of kids who do have autism, Julia gives their kids the invaluable opportunity to see themselves reflected on "Sesame Street." According to Westin, one mom has already used Julia's story as a way to let her 5-year-old daughter know she, too, had been diagnosed with autism — just like Julia.

Utilizing child psychologists and working with autism advocacy groups, "Sesame Street" is careful about how Julia is being portrayed.

About 1 in 68 children are believed to be on the autism spectrum, after all; the series doesn't want to imply Julia reflects the characteristics and experiences of everyone living with autism.  

"It’s tricky because autism is not one thing, because it is different for every single person who has autism," show writer Christine Ferraro told CBS News. "There is an expression that goes, 'If you’ve met one person with autism, you’ve met one person with autism.'"

On "Sesame Street," though, that one person is Julia — a friendly, flower-picking muppet that's making history. And there's no telling how many hearts will open and perspectives will change after she's welcomed into family rooms across the country.

True

A lot of people here are like family to me," Michelle says about Bread for the City — a community nonprofit located in Washington DC that provides local residents with food, clothing, health care, social advocacy, and legal services. And since the pandemic began, the need to support organizations like Bread for the City is greater than ever, which is why Amazon is Delivering Smiles to local charities across the country this holiday season.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.
via Brittany Kinley / Facebook

Brittany Kinley, a mother from Mansfield, Texas, had a hilarious mom fail her and she's chalking it up to being just another crazy thing that happened in 2020.

When Kinley filled out the order form for her son Mason's kindergarten class pictures, there was an option to have his name engraved into the photos. But Kinley wasn't interested in having her son's name on the photos so she wrote "I DON'T WANT THIS" on the box.

Well, it appears as though she should have left the box blank because the computer or incredibly literal human that designed the photographs wrote "I DON'T WANT THIS" where mason's name should be.

Keep Reading Show less
True

A lot of people here are like family to me," Michelle says about Bread for the City — a community nonprofit located in Washington DC that provides local residents with food, clothing, health care, social advocacy, and legal services. And since the pandemic began, the need to support organizations like Bread for the City is greater than ever, which is why Amazon is Delivering Smiles to local charities across the country this holiday season.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.

You know that feeling you get when you walk into a classroom and see someone else's stuff on your desk?

OK, sure, there are no assigned seats, but you've been sitting at the same desk since the first day and everyone knows it.

So why does the guy who sits next to you put his phone, his book, his charger, his lunch, and his laptop in the space that's rightfully yours? It's annoying!

Keep Reading Show less
via UDOT / Facebook

In December 2018, The Utah Department of Transportation opened the largest wildlife overpass in the state, spanning 320 by 50 feet across all six lanes of Interstate 80.

Its construction was intended to make traveling through the I-80 corridor in Summit County safer for motorists and the local wildlife.

The Salt Lake Tribune reports that there were over 100 animal incidents on the interstate since 2016, giving the stretch of highway the unfortunate nickname of "Slaughter Row."

Keep Reading Show less