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Why Ariel Winter chose a dress that showed her breast reduction scars.

Ariel Winter had breast reduction surgery. And she's not ashamed of it.

Why Ariel Winter chose a dress that showed her breast reduction scars.

In January, Ariel Winter rocked the red carpet at the Screen Actors Guild Awards in Los Angeles.

You might know her as studious middle child Alex Dunphy on the hit ABC series "Modern Family."

Winter was there to celebrate her show's two big nods — for Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Comedy Series and Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Comedy Series (shoutout to her TV dad, actor Ty Burrell).


Unfortunately, chatter started soon after Winter's red carpet appearance when photos revealed scarring from a medical procedure.

The 18-year-old had undergone breast reduction surgery in summer 2015 — a decision, she told People magazine, that she's "extremely happy with."

Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP.

Not only had the size of her breasts been causing her pain, but she hated that her body had become more of a conversation topic than her acting chops.

"It made me feel really uncomfortable, because as women in the industry, we are totally over-sexualized and treated like objects," Winter told Glamour last August. "Every article that has to do with me on a red carpet had to do with 'Ariel Winter's crazy cleavage!' or 'Ariel Winter shows huge boobs at an event!' That's all people would recognize me by — not, 'Oh, she does great work on 'Modern Family.'"

As a human being with free will, Winter certainly shouldn't feel ashamed of her decision to do what's best for her and her health.

And on Sunday, as tweets began rolling in, she made that very clear.

Winter shared a message on Twitter clarifying her decision to strut the red carpet the way she did.

Yes, Ariel!

I mean, for real.

Let's just take a moment and let it out.

Why should Winter feel ashamed? Bodies come in all shapes, sizes, colors, and genders — and yes, plenty have scars, too. What's there to hide?

Winter has become an outspoken social media badass, joining other young female stars like Amandla Stenberg and Rowan Blanchard.

Beyond promoting major body positivity on Twitter (her tweet after the SAG Awards has been Liked more than 1,400 times, by the way), Winter made waves last month for slamming misogynistic homophobe Nash Grier, whose popular Vine account bolstered him to Internet stardom in recent years.


Upon getting backlash from Grier's fans for the tweet, Winter penned a poignant response explaining how he's used his platform to promote dangerous rhetoric for quite some time, harming women and the LGBT community along the way (that tweet got a cool 27,000 Likes, FYI).

When Winter's not slaying Internet celebrities for ignorant comments, she's supporting cool groups with awesome missions — like, say, Amy Poehler's Smart Girls, which helps empower young women to follow their dreams.

She chatted with them at the SAG Awards about why she'd prefer to fast-forward to the future than meddle in the past:


It shouldn't be a big deal that Winter showed off her scars on the red carpet. But in today's world, it still is.

When so many of us might cover up our insecurities in order to be red-carpet-ready, it's nice to know at least one star is comfortable in her own skin — scars and all.


Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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via Anthony Crider / Flickr

Dozens of "White Lives Matter" rallies were scheduled to take place across America on Sunday. The events were scheduled in semi-private, encrypted chats on the Telegram app between Nazis, Proud Boys, and other right-wing extremists.

The organizers said the rallies would make "the whole world tremble."

However, the good news is that hardly any white supremacists showed up. In fact, the vast majority of people who did show up were counter-protesters.

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
True

Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

Keep Reading Show less