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Wait, a toy company published *what* in its magazine for girls?

Thankfully, she's trying to fix it for them.

LEGOs.

(Yep.)


What kid doesn't love 'em?


You can build almost anything with them!

Here is an incomplete list of things you can build with LEGOs.

A Millennium Falcon.


(Su-weet.)

A dinosaur park.


(Oh, the dinosaurs are in there alright. Biding their time, waiting for the perfect moment to strike.)

A complete, working, modern American city.

(Infrastructure = super fun!)

The whole point of LEGOs is to build things.

Unfortunately, it would seem that LEGO has been a little confused on this point lately.


Yup. Beauty tips. For girls. In a LEGO magazine.

Now, it might seem like things like blow drying, headband styling, and how to cut your hair if you have an oval face really have absolutely nothing to do with LEGOs...

(Because that's accurate. They don't. That's why it seems like that).

...but LEGO apparently thinks that publishing beauty advice instead of ways to build a bigger, more awesome death laser space cruiser is the only way to win over girls these days (or, probably more accurately, their parents' wallets).

Boo.

Anyway, enter Maia Weinstock. She's an editor at MIT News.

As an editor at a prestigious publication at one of America's premier universities, she spends most of her time hanging around being awesome, but in her limited down time, she made a LEGO set....

FEATURING WOMEN OF THE SUPREME COURT!

It's even got its own trailer.

Weinstock pitched the concept to LEGO, hoping that it could inspire young girls to see real, accomplished women as heroes.

Unfortunately, LEGO rejected it, telling Weinstock, "that it was in violation of their rule that they don't accept sets related to 'politics and political symbols.'"

Which is probably news to this guy.

(Honestly, Abe...)

And this house.


(That's some majesty right there.)

But whatever.

I sincerely hope LEGO comes around sooner rather than later because, honestly, we gotta get this thing into production. It's cool, it's bipartisan, and most importantly, it's far better for young girls than disturbingly intricate discussions of face shape.

Here's how to contact LEGO. Let them know they should start making that Sandra Day O'Connor action figure you never knew you needed until now.

That first car is a rite of passage into adulthood. Specifically, the hard-earned lesson of expectations versus reality. Though some of us are blessed with Teslas at 17, most teenagers receive a car that’s been … let’s say previously loved. And that’s probably a good thing, considering nearly half of first-year drivers end up in wrecks. Might as well get the dings on the lemon, right?

Of course, wrecks aside, buying a used car might end up costing more in the long run after needing repairs, breaking down and just a general slew of unexpected surprises. But hey, at least we can all look back and laugh.

My first car, for example, was a hand-me-down Toyota of some sort from my mother. I don’t recall the specific model, but I definitely remember getting into a fender bender within the first week of having it. She had forgotten to get the brakes fixed … isn’t that a fun story?

Jimmy Fallon recently asked his “Tonight Show” audience on Twitter to share their own worst car experiences. Some of them make my brake fiasco look like cakewalk (or cakedrive, in this case). Either way, these responses might make us all feel a little less alone. Or at the very least, give us a chuckle.

Here are 22 responses with the most horsepower:

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Joy

Man uses TikTok to offer 'dinner with dad' to any kid that needs one, even adult ones

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud.

Come for the food, stay for the wholesomeness.

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud. His TikTok channel is dedicated to giving people intimate conversations they might long to have with their own father, but can’t. The most popular is his “Dinner With Dad” segment.

The concept is simple: Clayton, aka Dad, always sets down two plates of food. He always tells you what’s for dinner. He always blesses the food. He always checks in with how you’re doing.

I stress the stability here, because as someone who grew up with a less-than-stable relationship with their parents, it stood out immediately. I found myself breathing a sigh of relief at Clayton’s consistency. I also noticed the immediate emotional connection created just by being asked, “How was your day?” According to relationship coach and couples counselor Don Olund, these two elements—stability and connection—are fundamental cravings that children have of their parents. Perhaps we never really stop needing it from them.


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TikTok about '80s childhood is a total Gen X flashback.

As a Gen X parent, it's weird to try to describe my childhood to my kids. We're the generation that didn't grow up with the internet or cell phones, yet are raising kids who have never known a world without them. That difference alone is enough to make our 1980s childhoods feel like a completely different planet, but there are other differences too that often get overlooked.

How do you explain the transition from the brown and orange aesthetic of the '70s to the dusty rose and forest green carpeting of the '80s if you didn't experience it? When I tell my kids there were smoking sections in restaurants and airplanes and ashtrays everywhere, they look horrified (and rightfully so—what were we thinking?!). The fact that we went places with our friends with no quick way to get ahold of our parents? Unbelievable.

One day I described the process of listening to the radio, waiting for my favorite song to come on so I could record it on my tape recorder, and how mad I would get when the deejay talked through the intro of the song until the lyrics started. My Spotify-spoiled kids didn't even understand half of the words I said.

And '80s hair? With the feathered bangs and the terrible perms and the crunchy hair spray? What, why and how?

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