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'Use the bathroom before you leave the house,' and 15 other pieces of totally momworthy advice.

For Mother's Day, we asked Upworthy readers on Facebook and Twitter to tell us what they learned from their moms. They had a lot of great lessons to share.

'Use the bathroom before you leave the house,' and 15 other pieces of totally momworthy advice.

Everyone had something to say about their moms. Most good. All honest. Here are our favorites.

Thanks to everyone who chimed in and made this post possible. Here's what the rest of your moms had to say when we asked you to share the best advice your mom ever gave you.

1. Advice about making smart choices, with bonus comedy!



2. Advice about controlling your own fate and happiness.

3. Advice about realizing that not all moms will be great at their jobs, and that others might step up into their place.

4. Advice about living bravely when the odds are stacked against you.

5. Advice about the more complex things in life, like dealing with hangovers.

7. Advice about not sweating the small stuff.

8. Advice about being tough in difficult situations.

FULL DISCLOSURE: This works for me every time, 30% of the time.

Also this gem:

9. Advice about the right to step back and take care of yourself.

10. Speaking of which, advice about a woman's right to enjoy herself.

11. Profound advice about when to use crude language.

12. Thoughtful advice about having the right priorities in the right moment.

13. Respectful advice about how to treat everyone around you.

14. Compassionate advice about knowing WHY you should treat everyone around you well.

15. And finally, advice about always taking a step back and getting some perspective.


Happy Mother's Day to all the people who are moms in the world. You have a really tough job, and most of you do it with a grace and humor that not many people can really understand — particularly my wife, who deals with a 3-year-old every day (3-year-olds are evolution's way of letting you know that no matter how impressive your résumé is, you are not that special).

BONUS ADVICE:

Wisdom about purse snakes.


Truer words have never been spoken.

PLEASE NOTE: This post excludes the two most popular choices that many people wrote: "Always wear clean underwear" and "This too shall pass." There's a joke that could be made there, but I will refrain.

What's the best advice your mom ever gave you?

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

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"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

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Everyone's childhood is different. But there are common objects, sights, sounds, smells, and memories from elementary school that most Gen Xers and Millenials share.

Personally, when i think back to being in elementary school in the '80s, I remember the taste of the chocolate ship cookie we got on Fridays (with the pizza). The humiliation of getting nailed in the back during nation ball. And the grumbling, grinding sound that happened when you slipped a disk into the drive on an Apple IIe computer.

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Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."