Twitter is telling college freshmen what they're doing now, and it's almost too real.

Thousands of young adults around the world are starting their college careers right now. These tweets nail that first-year experience.

Remember your first semester at college?


Or maybe you don't.


Well, so does comedian Jenny Jaffe. She recently noticed the hordes of New York University freshman clogging the sidewalks. In an email exchange, Jaffe told Upworthy: "I found myself giggling thinking about all of the awkward ways I tried to fit in and how I was just this completely different, totally lost person."

So she started the hashtag #RightNowAFreshman to highlight some of the best and worst of those times.

"[R]ight now, freshmen all over the country and world are having experiences that they'll remember, laugh, and shake their heads in embarrassment at forever. It just started being a fun game I was playing by myself, tweeting on the train." — Jenny Jaffe

Because who doesn't love an occasion to sigh with relief at how far they've come?


Imagine how much better it could've been if you got some real talk about college.

Maybe fewer nights like this. GIF from "Looney Tunes."

Jaffe's hashtag took off, and now tons of older-and-wiser grads are using #RightNowAFreshman on Twitter to talk about the awkward ins and outs of being a college newbie.

The result was a series of tweets that sum up the trials and tribulations college freshman face — almost too perfectly.

Like the struggles of creating new relationships.


Or fearing (or embracing) the freshman 15.

And learning new things — and excitedly showing off your new knowledge.

Thank goodness for spell check. Image via Twitter/zzzzaaaacccchhh.

And just like college life, the hashtag reflects it ain't all fun and games.

Some folks talked about colleges' struggle to address sexual assault.

A recent survey showed that college presidents thought that rape is a widespread problem — just not on their college campuses. Typical.

And the struggle of feeling homesick when being away from friends and family.

But people took the time to remind students that despite all the hurdles of college life, everything will work out.


I mean, we all are here to tell our tales, right?

GIF by xborntofly/Tumblr.

What freshman year moments do you not miss? Hop on Twitter to share in the fun.

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