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Twitter is telling college freshmen what they're doing now, and it's almost too real.

Thousands of young adults around the world are starting their college careers right now. These tweets nail that first-year experience.

Twitter is telling college freshmen what they're doing now, and it's almost too real.

Remember your first semester at college?


Or maybe you don't.


Well, so does comedian Jenny Jaffe. She recently noticed the hordes of New York University freshman clogging the sidewalks. In an email exchange, Jaffe told Upworthy: "I found myself giggling thinking about all of the awkward ways I tried to fit in and how I was just this completely different, totally lost person."

So she started the hashtag #RightNowAFreshman to highlight some of the best and worst of those times.

"[R]ight now, freshmen all over the country and world are having experiences that they'll remember, laugh, and shake their heads in embarrassment at forever. It just started being a fun game I was playing by myself, tweeting on the train." — Jenny Jaffe

Because who doesn't love an occasion to sigh with relief at how far they've come?


Imagine how much better it could've been if you got some real talk about college.

Maybe fewer nights like this. GIF from "Looney Tunes."

Jaffe's hashtag took off, and now tons of older-and-wiser grads are using #RightNowAFreshman on Twitter to talk about the awkward ins and outs of being a college newbie.

The result was a series of tweets that sum up the trials and tribulations college freshman face — almost too perfectly.

Like the struggles of creating new relationships.


Or fearing (or embracing) the freshman 15.

And learning new things — and excitedly showing off your new knowledge.

Thank goodness for spell check. Image via Twitter/zzzzaaaacccchhh.

And just like college life, the hashtag reflects it ain't all fun and games.

Some folks talked about colleges' struggle to address sexual assault.

A recent survey showed that college presidents thought that rape is a widespread problem — just not on their college campuses. Typical.

And the struggle of feeling homesick when being away from friends and family.

But people took the time to remind students that despite all the hurdles of college life, everything will work out.


I mean, we all are here to tell our tales, right?

GIF by xborntofly/Tumblr.

What freshman year moments do you not miss? Hop on Twitter to share in the fun.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.