Trump's 'lynching' claim draws swift, severe backlash—and deservedly so

In a completely unsurprising yet somehow still somewhat shocking move, the President of the United States has compared his impeachment inquiry to a lynching.

A lynching. There are just no words.


People with consciences everywhere were quick to condemn the tweet, explaining what really should not need to be explained. That calling a legal process a "lynching" is both factually erroneous and blatantly inappropriate. That a white man in power harkening to historical violence against black people in an attempt to paint himself as a victim is racist as all get out. That the comparison is horrendous and hurtful and beneath the basics of human decency, much less the dignity of the office of the President.

The backlash was swift, severe, and completely deserved.

Scholar and author Ibram Kendi called out Trump's audacity:

Bernice King, daughter of Martin Luther King, Jr., pointed out that the tweet is "a reflection of the very real trajectory of our nation and the very repugnant evil of racism, which still permeates both legislation and language in the United States."

RELATED: 'Everything is racist these days' because white supremacy is as American as apple pie

Some took the tack of sharing the tragic images of actual lynchings to drive home the appalling offense of such a comparison.


RELATED: A teacher had her 8th graders write 'funny' captions under slavery-era photos. Seriously, WTF.

Others sought to educate the ignorant on what lynching really is and why it's not a term to be tossed around lightly.

Congresswoman Frederica Wilson from Florida, who has served in the House of Representatives since 2011, called the tweet "despicable and disgusting" and anyone who defended it "reprehensible."

Of course, people have defended it because it's 2019 and nothing makes sense anymore. Lindsey Graham told the press that what the president is experiencing is "a lynching in every sense."

Seriously? "In every sense." What is wrong with you, man?


Some have tried to call the backlash against the use of the word "lynching" hypocritical, pointing out that the same people calling it out are okay with calling those who engage in white supremacy "Nazis."

Except that the Nazis were a political party with a racist ideology similar to those who performed lynchings, not the victims of racist, violent oppression. Also, it's not exactly a stretch to invoke the word "Nazi" when actual neo-Nazis voice support for someone in power—someone who also reportedly kept a copy of Hitler's speeches by his bed.

Soooo, yeah. Not the samesies, Mike.

A man who has been repeatedly accused of racism since long before his presidency using the word "lynching" to describe the constitutional checks and balances in our political system is gross on every level. It just is. And while calling him out on it will do absolutely nothing to change his ways, it's good to see that not all Americans have abandoned reason and decency.

Carry on and keep fighting the good fight, fellow citizens.

History books are filled with photos of people we know primarily from their life stories or own writings. To picture them in real life, we must rely on sparse or grainy black-and-white photos and our own imaginations.

Now, thanks to some tech geeks with a dream, we can get a bit closer to seeing what iconic historical figures looked like in real life.

Most of us know Frederick Douglass as the famous abolitionist—a formerly enslaved Black American who wrote extensively about his experiences—but we may not know that he was also the most photographed American in the 19th century. In fact, we have more portraits of Frederick Douglass than we do of Abraham Lincoln.

This plethora of photos was on purpose. Douglass felt that photographs—as opposed to caricatures that were so often drawn of Black people—captured "the essential humanity of its subjects" and might help change how white people saw Black people.

In other words, he used photos to humanize himself and other Black people in white people's eyes.

Imagine what he'd think of the animating technology utilized on myheritage.com that allows us to see what he might have looked like in motion. La Marr Jurelle Bruce, a Black Studies professor at the University of Maryland, shared videos he created using photos of Douglass and the My Heritage Deep Nostalgia technology on Twitter.

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Courtesy of Creative Commons
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After years of service as a military nurse in the naval Marine Corps, Los Angeles, California-resident Rhonda Jackson became one of the 37,000 retired veterans in the U.S. who are currently experiencing homelessness — roughly eight percent of the entire homeless population.

"I was living in a one-bedroom apartment with no heat for two years," Jackson said. "The Department of Veterans Affairs was doing everything they could to help but I was not in a good situation."

One day in 2019, Jackson felt a sudden sense of hope for a better living arrangement when she caught wind of the ongoing construction of Veteran's Village in Carson, California — a 51-unit affordable housing development with one, two and three-bedroom apartments and supportive services to residents through a partnership with U.S.VETS.

Her feelings of hope quickly blossomed into a vision for her future when she learned that Veteran's Village was taking applications for residents to move in later that year after construction was complete.

"I was entered into a lottery and I just said to myself, 'Okay, this is going to work out,'" Jackson said. "The next thing I knew, I had won the lottery — in more ways than one."

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'Love is a battlefield' indeed. They say you have to kiss ~~at least~~ a few frogs to find your prince and it's inevitable that in seeking long-term romantic satisfaction, slip ups will happen. Whether it's a lack of compatibility, unfortunate circumstances, or straight up bad taste in the desired sex, your first shot at monogamous bliss might not succeed. And that's okay! Those experiences enrich our lives and strengthen our resolve to find love. That's what I tell myself when trying to rationalize my three-month stint with the bassist of a terrible noise rock band.


One woman's viral tweet about a tacky mug wall encouraged people to share stories about second loves. Okay, first things first: Ana Stanowick's mom has a new boyfriend who's basically perfect. All the evidence you need is in the photograph:

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via Saturday Night Live / YouTube

Through 46 seasons, "Saturday Night Live" has had its ups and downs. There were the golden years of '75 to '80 and, of course, the early '90s when everyone in the cast seemed to eventually become a superstar.

Then there were the disastrous '81 and '85 seasons where the show completely lost its identity and was on the brink of cancellation.

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