Trump's 'lynching' claim draws swift, severe backlash—and deservedly so

In a completely unsurprising yet somehow still somewhat shocking move, the President of the United States has compared his impeachment inquiry to a lynching.

A lynching. There are just no words.


People with consciences everywhere were quick to condemn the tweet, explaining what really should not need to be explained. That calling a legal process a "lynching" is both factually erroneous and blatantly inappropriate. That a white man in power harkening to historical violence against black people in an attempt to paint himself as a victim is racist as all get out. That the comparison is horrendous and hurtful and beneath the basics of human decency, much less the dignity of the office of the President.

The backlash was swift, severe, and completely deserved.

Scholar and author Ibram Kendi called out Trump's audacity:

Bernice King, daughter of Martin Luther King, Jr., pointed out that the tweet is "a reflection of the very real trajectory of our nation and the very repugnant evil of racism, which still permeates both legislation and language in the United States."

RELATED: 'Everything is racist these days' because white supremacy is as American as apple pie

Some took the tack of sharing the tragic images of actual lynchings to drive home the appalling offense of such a comparison.


RELATED: A teacher had her 8th graders write 'funny' captions under slavery-era photos. Seriously, WTF.

Others sought to educate the ignorant on what lynching really is and why it's not a term to be tossed around lightly.

Congresswoman Frederica Wilson from Florida, who has served in the House of Representatives since 2011, called the tweet "despicable and disgusting" and anyone who defended it "reprehensible."

Of course, people have defended it because it's 2019 and nothing makes sense anymore. Lindsey Graham told the press that what the president is experiencing is "a lynching in every sense."

Seriously? "In every sense." What is wrong with you, man?


Some have tried to call the backlash against the use of the word "lynching" hypocritical, pointing out that the same people calling it out are okay with calling those who engage in white supremacy "Nazis."

Except that the Nazis were a political party with a racist ideology similar to those who performed lynchings, not the victims of racist, violent oppression. Also, it's not exactly a stretch to invoke the word "Nazi" when actual neo-Nazis voice support for someone in power—someone who also reportedly kept a copy of Hitler's speeches by his bed.

Soooo, yeah. Not the samesies, Mike.

A man who has been repeatedly accused of racism since long before his presidency using the word "lynching" to describe the constitutional checks and balances in our political system is gross on every level. It just is. And while calling him out on it will do absolutely nothing to change his ways, it's good to see that not all Americans have abandoned reason and decency.

Carry on and keep fighting the good fight, fellow citizens.

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