Trump's harshest critics are sending him messages of support. Here's why they're right.
via US Secretary of Defense / Flickr

It's understandably difficult for many Americans to muster up much sympathy for President Trump right now. As the leader of the country, his downplaying of COVID-19 led to tens of thousands of unnecessary deaths.

So to see him fall victim to the disease he helped perpetuate feels a lot like karmic retribution.

He's also been callous when it comes to separating children from their families at the border, sent messages of support for white supremacists, and openly admitted to sexually assaulting women.


It can be a little difficult to feel any sympathy for the First Lady as well. Recently leaked audio shows her making callous comments about children separated for their families at the border.

To be internally conflicted about complex events is to be human. But, in the end, it's always best to be the bigger person and err on the side of decency — as hard as that may be.

As Michelle Obama once said, "When they go low, we go high." Unfortunately, that's not a road a lot of people are taking right now on social media. It may be a big relief for many to post "I told you so" on Facebook or to take a gleeful stab at the president in a moment of schadenfreude.

But all that does is bring you down to the president's level.

I see it already, tweets from supporters of the president saying that all that "we go high" stuff was just a front. That it was just a veil to cover up for pettiness and jealousy.

Gleeful tweets about the First Family's health stand in stark contrast to the reason tens of millions of people have fought back against this presidency: a belief in decency.

We care about people's health. We care about the country's most vulnerable. We care about human decency.

Some of the president's harshest critics have come out to send messages of support to him and the First Lady at a time when it's incredibly easy and satisfying to take a shot. That's because they're living the values that led them to despise the president.

Actress Alyssa Milano chastised President Trump a few days ago for politicizing the virus.


Rachel Maddow has been one of the strongest voices in making the case for impeachment over the Russia scandal.

Trump's opponent Joe Biden recently said he's "downright un-American."


Bernie Sanders accused Trump of attempting to "undermine Democracy."


Governor Andrew Cuomo of New York recently said that Trump "better have an army" if he comes into his city.


Jamie Lee Curtis once criticized Trump for making inappropriate comments about her "Parent Trap" co-star Lindsay Lohan.


Democratic Representative Adam Schiff has been one of Trump's harshest critics and has openly called for his removal from office.

Former Democratic presidential frontrunner Pete Buttigieg called Trump the "least qualified" of all 2020 candidates.


One day this presidency is going to end and, hopefully, it's in a few months. Why not our collective reaction to the health of the president and his wife be one final way to display a decency they never could.

Michelle Obama's words still matter: "You don't stoop to their level," she said. "Our motto is when they go low, we go high." That motto has served as a north star for millions of Americans over the past four years, let's follow it 'til the end.

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