Tinder is adding a 'panic' button to help address the safety anxiety of first dates

When you meet someone on a dating app, you risk so much more than just getting your heart broken.

Forget the traditional "bad date," there are countless literal horror stories of women being sexually assaulted by people they met on a dating app. According to UK's National Crime Agency, the number of sexual offenses involving dating sites and apps rose by 450% between 2014 and 2018. To make things worse, recent reports discovered that many dating apps, including Tinder, don't screen for sexual offenders. Thankfully, the already haywire world of dating is getting a little safer as Tinder rolls out a slew of safety features, including a panic button.


The "Tinder Timeline" will allow users to upload details about their date, including location, before they actually go meet up with a stranger from the internet. Users can share the Tinder Timeline with friends, because it's always smart to let someone know where you're going to be.

RELATED: Woman posts awful 'tips' a guy sent her after a bad Tinder date. Love is dead.

Once on the actual date, users can press the panic button if they feel unsafe, and the app will contact emergency services with highly accurate location data and details about the date. First, emergency services will send a text so the user won't have to tip their date off by talking. If the text goes unanswered, dispatchers will send a code and call the user. If there's still no answer, emergency services will be sent to the rescue.

The new tools are available on the "Safety Center" section of the app. In order to actually use the panic button, users will have to download Noonlight, a personal safety app that Match Group recently partnered with. Right now, the panic button is only available on Tinder, but Match Group has plans to offer the panic button on other Match Group dating apps, including PlentyOfFish, OkCupid, and Hinge.

RELATED: For a decade, a man's last tweet was a joke about a girl. 10 years later, he shared a happy ending.

Match Group is the first dating company to invest in an emergency response service, according to chief executive Mandy Ginsberg. Tinder has been around since 2012, and it almost seems a little late for the app to get in on the safety game, but thank goodness it's happening at all. Apps are making our lives easier, but they also have the power to put people in sketchy situations in ways that didn't exist before. Just ten years ago, you'd be crazy to get in a car with a total stranger. Today, it's just Uber – an app that has also ramped up its safety measures following controversy.

Dating shouldn't put you in danger. Women have often relied on things like "women's intuition" to avoid danger on dates. Now, we have technology to back up those tried and true techniques.

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

Vanna White appeared on "The Price Is Right" in 1980.

Vanna White has been a household name in the United States for decades, which is kind of hilarious when you consider how she gained her fame and fortune. Since 1982, the former model and actress has made millions walking back and forth turning letters (and later simply touching them—yay technology) on the game show "Wheel of Fortune."

That's it. Walking back and forth in a pretty evening gown, flipping letters and clapping for contestants. More on that job in a minute…

As a member of Gen X, television game shows like "Wheel of Fortune" and "The Price is Right" send me straight back to my childhood. Watching this clip from 1980 of Vanna White competing on "The Price is Right" two years before she started turning letters on "Wheel of Fortune" is like stepping into a time machine. Bob Barker's voice, the theme music, the sound effects—I swear I'm home from school sick, lying on the ugly flowered couch with my mom checking my forehead and bringing me Tang.

This video has it all: the early '80s hairstyles, a fresh-faced Vanna White and Bob Barker's casual sexism that would never in a million years fly today.

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