T.I. says he goes to the gynecologist with his daughter to 'check her hymen'
Instagram / troubleman31

Everyone's parenting style is different. Some people parent like it's still the middle ages and their virgin daughters are a prized possession. While talking with hosts Nazanin Mandi and Nadia Moham on the "Ladies Like Us" podcast, rapper T.I. was asked if he had the sex talk with his daughter. T.I. said that not only has he had the sex talk, he's taken it one step further – further than anyone living in the 21st century should probably ever go.

"Deyjah's 18, just graduated high school now and she's attending her first year of college, figuring it out for herself," T.I. said on the podcast. "And yes, not only have we had the conversation, we have yearly trips to the gynecologist to check her hymen. Yes, I go with her." Yes, he makes sure his daughter gets a virginity test. Yes, the World Health Organization calls virginity tests "a violation of the human rights of girls and women."


T.I. even brought up a specific example. "So it's this one time we go, I think this might have been after her 16th birthday. This is what we do. Right after the birthday we celebrate. Usually like the day after the party, she's enjoying her gifts. I put a sticky note on the door: 'Gyno. Tomorrow. 9:30.,'" he said.

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"So we'll go and sit down and the doctor comes and talks, and the doctor's maintaining a high level of professionalism. He's like, 'You know, sir, I have to, in order to share information' — I'm like, 'Deyjah, they want you to sign this so we can share information. Is there anything you would not want me to know? See, Doc? Ain't no problem,'" he continued.

A woman's hymen can be broken in ways that don't include sexual intercourse, a fact that T.I. is well aware of. "And so then they come and say, 'Well, I just want you to know that there are other ways besides sex that the hymen can be broken like bike riding, athletics, horseback riding, and just other forms of athletic physical activity,'" he continued. "So I say, 'Look, Doc, she don't ride no horses, she don't ride no bike, she don't play no sports. Just check the hymen, please, and give me back my results expeditiously.'"

He then did what is probably every girl's worst nightmare. He shared the status of his daughter's hymen with the entire world. "I will say, as of her 18th birthday, her hymen is still intact," he said.

RELATED: I saved my 'virginity' for marriage, and it worked out great — until it didn't

There is a method to T.I.'s madness. His reasoning is that most kids are grateful when their parents help keep them out of trouble. "I think that most kids in hindsight, looking back, they always thank their parents for not allowing them to damage themselves as much as they could have," he said on the podcast.

Not surprisingly, a lot of people found T.I.'s comments to be problematic. On the podcasts, the hosts called Deyjah a "prisoner." Some Twitter users wrote critiques of T.I.'s parenting style.











An intact hymen isn't a marker of good parenting. Invasive tests to "prove" virginity aren't markers of good parenting either. We now know more about T.I.'s daughter than we ever should.

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From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

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Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

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Courtesy of CeraVe
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"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

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First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

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