This viral cartoon about a dad's 'useless nipples' has struck a chord with nursing moms.

This mom's visual aid for her husband explaining why she's cranky in the morning is hilarious and true.

Breastfeeding mom Mattea Goff wanted to show her husband why she's "not in the best of moods first thing in the morning," so she drew a series of cartoons to show him what's happening through the night while he sleeps.

So this past weekend I was having a hard time finding the words (probably because I haven't had any sleep) to express to...


Posted by Mattea Goff on Thursday, October 11, 2018

The series begins with the couple sleeping while their baby snoozes in a cot next to the bed. Gott drew an arrow pointing to her husband's shirtless chest with the label "useless nipples," and every nursing mother immediately laughed out loud.

Then, "2 hours later . . ." Baby starts crying, Mom jolts awake, and Dad continues to saw logs.

Screenshot via Mattea Goff/Facebook.

That scene alone is familiar to moms everywhere. Then it gets even more real.  

In the second drawing, Mom dutifully nurses Baby, which is not necessarily the tranquil, soothing act one might think it would be. This wee one appears to be a slapper. The bags under Mom's eyes make it clear that she's unable to doze through this feeding/slapfest.

Meanwhile, Dad has rolled over, but is still snoozing away.

Screenshot via Mattea Goff/Facebook

Then it's time to switch sides because Baby's not done yet. As Mom gets repeatedly impaled by tiny Baby's claws, she thinks, "I really need to clip her nails."

Meanwhile, Dad and his "still useless nipples" are still sleeping.

Baby gets done eating, then spits up, because of course. While Mom musters every ounce of energy she has to clean it up, Dad continues to sleep the night away.

Screenshot via Mattea Goff/Facebook

Now Baby is sleeping next to Mom. If you're wondering why she hasn't put Baby back in the cot, my experienced guess is it's because Mom is too tired to see straight, much less care that she's sleeping in a wet spot and being kicked by her mini-human, who appears to be trying to make its way back into her uterus.

Plus, Baby's just going to want to nurse again in an hour anyway. But Baby is sweaty because tiny tykes turn into ovens when they sleep. Mom is freezing because Dad keeps rolling over and pulling off her covers. And Dad? Still happily snoozing the night away.

This is all. Too. Real.

Screenshot via Mattea Goff/Facebook

Finally, morning arrives. Baby is zonked out peacefully between Mom and Dad. Mom is a fried-out, touched-out mess because she hasn't had four hours of uninterrupted sleep in months and has been wrangling a hungry, squirmy, pukey, sweaty baby all night.

Meanwhile, Dad and his "still completely useless" nipples wake up bright-eyed and bushy-tailed with, "Good morning, honey! Isn't sleeping in great? Let's cuddle!"

Screenshot via Mattea Goff/Facebook

Goff's cartoon clearly resonated with moms everywhere, as it's been shared more than 170,000 times on Facebook.

Mattea Goff isn't a celebrity or a mom blogger or an internet influencer. She's an average mom sharing an average night's sleep with a breastfeeding baby. Maybe that's why her hand-drawn cartoon hit home with so many parents—she nailed an experience that so many of us have had.

The fact that she had to literally draw it out for her husband is hilariously familiar. My husband was highly involved in the care of our babies, but I exclusively breastfed them for the first six months, so nighttime nursing was my reality. It wasn't my husband's fault that his nipples were so useless and I didn't blame him for getting much-needed rest, but his ability to sleep through most of my wakings meant he couldn't always grasp how freaking tired I was.

Speaking of which, if anyone feels defensive on behalf of well-rested dads, Goff explained on a follow-up Facebook post that her cartoon wasn't an attempt to shame her husband:

I think the majority of people got exactly what I was trying to convey, but, just to be clear I really wasn't trying to vilify the one person who is getting some sleep, my husband, aka Mr. Useless Nipples. Breastfeeding exclusively was my decision, and it's something my husband supports and greatly appreciates. He's a very involved father in so many other ways. It's true that even the best of dads can step it up now and again and I may or may not fantasize about kicking him off the bed when he is able to sleep through most midnight adventures (a talent I do not possess...). Being a mom is seriously hard work, but so is being a good dad and I love and appreciate him for it. #uselessnipples#weloveourdads

Don't worry. We got it. And it was awesome.

Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels
True

Increasingly customers are looking for more conscious shopping options. According to a Nielsen survey in 2018, nearly half (48%) of U.S. consumers say they would definitely or probably change their consumption habits to reduce their impact on the environment.

But while many consumers are interested in spending their money on products that are more sustainable, few actually follow through. An article in the 2019 issue of Harvard Business Review revealed that 65% of consumers said they want to buy purpose-driven brands that advocate sustainability, but only about 26% actually do so. It's unclear where this intention gap comes from, but thankfully it's getting more convenient to shop sustainably from many of the retailers you already support.

Amazon recently introduced Climate Pledge Friendly, "a new program to help make it easy for customers to discover and shop for more sustainable products." When you're browsing Amazon, a Climate Pledge Friendly label will appear on more than 45,000 products to signify they have one or more different sustainability certifications which "help preserve the natural world, reducing the carbon footprint of shipments to customers," according to the online retailer.

Amazon

In order to distinguish more sustainable products, the program partnered with a wide range of external certifications, including governmental agencies, non-profits, and independent laboratories, all of which have a focus on preserving the natural world.

Keep Reading Show less
Wikiimages by Pixabay, Dr. Jacqueline Antonovich/Twitter

The 1776 Report isn't just bad, it's historically bad, in every way possible.

When journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones published her Pulitzer Prize-winning 1619 Project for The New York Times, some backlash was inevitable. Instead of telling the story of America's creation through the eyes of the colonial architects of our system of government, Hannah-Jones retold it through the eyes of the enslaved Africans who were forced to help build the nation without reaping the benefits of democracy. Though a couple of historical inaccuracies have had to be clarified and corrected, the 1619 Project is groundbreaking, in that it helps give voice to a history that has long been overlooked and underrepresented in our education system.

The 1776 Report, in turn, is a blaring call to return to the whitewashed curriculums that silence that voice.

In September of last year, President Trump blasted the 1619 Project, which he called "toxic propaganda" and "ideological poison" that "will destroy our country." He subsequently created a commission to tell the story of America's founding the way he wanted it told—in the form of a "patriotic education" with all of the dog whistles that that phrase entails.

Mission accomplished, sort of.

Keep Reading Show less
True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.