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This adorable daddy-daughter Super Bowl ad will give you all the feels.

Watch these NFL players give the 'dad-do' to their daughters.

This adorable daddy-daughter Super Bowl ad will give you all the feels.

We know that football players rely on toughness to make it through a season. Now a few of them are going to face their toughest challenge yet.

It doesn't matter if you're a mom or dad. Styling your daughter's hair can be pretty challenging. 

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And it's easy to forget that a lot of NFL players — giant men who run into other giant men for a living — are also dads. They have lives at home. Many of them are even raising tiny female humans who have hair that needs taming.


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So Pantene stepped up its game by inviting three NFL players to style their daughters' hair for its "Strong Is Beautiful" campaign for its upcoming Super Bowl commercial.  Here's how it went down.

First up was DeAngelo Williams from the Pittsburgh Steelers and his daughter Rhiya.

Rhiya was ready for her daddy to do his thing. Images via Pantene/YouTube.

He struggled a bit in the beginning and admits that carrying a football is easier than styling hair because "I have help running through that defensive line." 

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He persevered, and Rhiya was pretty pleased with the results.

Boom.

Next was Benjamin Watson of the New Orleans Saints and his daughter Grace.

Grace was ready for her chance to sit in the hot seat.

Grace expressed that she was excited and a bit nervous, but Benjamin was ready to dive in.

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"It's fun to do something new and spend this time with my daughter," he said.

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After a little bit of time, Grace was styled up in a pair of twin braids and was happy with the results.

Another satisfied customer.

Last, but not least, was Jason Witten of the Dallas Cowboys and his daughter Landry.

Jason is known for his great hands on the football field, but how "great" are they when it comes to styling Landry's hair?

Jason admits that Landry's mom has the skills when it comes to making her hair look pretty. He also readily admits that "catching a touchdown pass is easier than creating a beautiful braid."

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Of the three dads, Jason probably struggled the most — but props to the dude for sticking with it. 

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The end result? Adorable pigtails for his adorable little girl. 

That is one happy toddler.

At the end of the day, little girls care more about the quality time they spend with their daddies than the hairdos created for them.

Yes, this is an absolutely adorable commercial, and I wouldn't fault anyone for experiencing a severe case of sweaty eyeballs after watching it, but a deeper message shouldn't be ignored.

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The role that dads play in the lives of their daughters in terms of their self-esteem, body image, and future relationships is huge. Kudos to Pantene for recognizing that and putting this message on display for millions of viewers to watch. 

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Speaking of watching, you can check out a sneak peek of the commercial here. 

When the "Me Too" movement exploded a few years ago, the ubiquitousness of women's sexual harassment and assault experiences became painfully clear. What hasn't always been as clear is role that less overt, more subtle creepiness plays in making women feel uncomfortable or unsafe as they move through the world, often starting from a young age.

Thankfully—and unfortunately—a viral video from a teen TikToker illustrates exactly what that looks like in real-time when a man came and sat down with her while she was doing a live video. He asked if the chair at her table was taken, and she said no, thinking he wanted to take it to another table. Instead, he sat down and started talking to her. You can see in her face and in her responses that she's weirded out, though she's trying not to appear rude or paranoid.

The teen said in a separate TikTok video that the man appeared to be in his 30s. Definitely too old to be pulling up a chair with someone so young who is sitting by herself, and definitely old enough to recognize that she was uncomfortable with the situation.

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The global eradication of smallpox in 1980 is one of international public health's greatest successes. But in 1966, seven years after the World Health Organization announced a plan to rid the world of the disease, smallpox was still widespread. The culprits? A lack of funds, personnel and vaccine supply.

Meanwhile, outbreaks across South America, Africa, and Asia continued, as the highly contagious virus continued to kill three out of every 10 people who caught it, while leaving many survivors disfigured. It took a renewed commitment of resources from wealthy nations to fulfill the promise made in 1959.

Forty-one years later, although we face a different virus, the potential for vast destruction is just as great, and the challenges of funding, personnel and supply are still with us, along with last-mile distribution. Today, while 30% of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated, with numbers rising every day, there is an overwhelming gap between wealthy countries and the rest of the world. It's becoming evident that the impact on the countries getting left behind will eventually boomerang back to affect us all.

Photo by ismail mohamed - SoviLe on Unsplash

The international nonprofit CARE recently released a policy paper that lays out the case for U.S. investment in a worldwide vaccination campaign. Founded 75 years ago, CARE works in over 100 countries and reaches more than 90 million people around the world through multiple humanitarian aid programs. Of note is the organization's worldwide reputation for its unshakeable commitment to the dignity of people; they're known for working hand-in-hand with communities and hold themselves to a high standard of accountability.

"As we enter into our second year of living with COVID-19, it has become painfully clear that the safety of any person depends on the global community's ability to protect every person," says Michelle Nunn, CARE USA's president and CEO. "While wealthy nations have begun inoculating their populations, new devastatingly lethal variants of the virus continue to emerge in countries like India, South Africa and Brazil. If vaccinations don't effectively reach lower-income countries now, the long-term impact of COVID-19 will be catastrophic."

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