These adorable yarn dissection kits let students swap knives for needles.

Remember the first time you had to dissect an animal in biology class?

I do. For me, it was a frog. And what I remember most was the terrible smell. I may have learned about (and subsequently forgotten) a frog's insides. But I also learned that anatomy was not the academic focus for me.


Image via "Pitch Perfect."

I probably would have felt a lot differently about the whole thing, though, if my biology lab had involved one of Emily Stoneking's cuddly creatures.

Emily sells knitted dissected animals on her Etsy shop called — wait for it — aKNITomy.

The animals are a lot nicer to look at than your typical formaldehyde-soaked dissection specimen. Plus, they offer a great alternative to dissecting animals. (According to Last Chance for Animals, over 6 million animals are killed each year so that they can be dissected.)

“The real deal [of dissection] is pretty messy and there are not a lot of distinct colors, and I want it to look more like an anatomical illustration," Emily said to Bored Panda, though she admits the creatures' innards aren't completely anatomically correct.

“What I wanted to do is create an homage to science and the artists who illustrated the work of past anatomists," Emily told Upworthy. I wanted to create a piece of art where the dichotomy between gross and weird and cuddly and familiar would maybe make people stop and appreciate anatomy in a different or new way."

Emily sells animals like this frog, which she calls "the iconic image of high school biology class."

It's much cuter than the one I vivisected in eighth grade.

All photos from Emily's Etsy shop, used with permission.

She also sells this white rat, complete with tiny pink paws.

The rat also comes in a vegan version with yarn made from cotton and other plant fibers.

What's next? Emily has also started making human anatomy creations, like this bisected head:

And this awesome brain, complete with a knitted neuron:

These woolen animals and anatomy parts are awesome conversation pieces to hang on your wall, but they're also practical. After you examine your little buddy's organs, you can remove the pins and take your lab animal off the dissection table for a cuddle sesh. They're part stuffed animal, part science project.

Arguably even cooler? If you want to, you can learn about anatomy while you learn how to knit, too. Emily sells her knitting patterns and DIY kits for making your own cute, dissectible animal.

True

$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


Sir David Attenborough has one of the most recognized and beloved voices in the world. The British broadcaster and nature historian has spent most of his 94 years on Earth educating humanity about the wonders of the natural world, inspiring multiple generations to care about the planet we all call home.

And now, Attenborough has made a new name for himself. Not only has he joined the cool kids on Instagram, he's broken the record for reaching a million followers in the shortest period. It only took four hours and 44 minutes, which is less time than it took Jennifer Aniston, who held the title before him at 5 hours and 16 minutes.

A day later, Attenborough is sitting at a whopping 3.4 million followers. And he only has two Instagram posts so far, both of them videos. But just watch his first one and you'll see why he's attracted so many fans.

Keep Reading Show less
True

$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


Schools often have to walk a fine line when it comes to parental complaints. Diverse backgrounds, beliefs, and preferences for what kids see and hear will always mean that schools can't please everyone all the time, so educators have to discern what's best for the whole, broad spectrum of kids in their care.

Sometimes, what's best is hard to discern. Sometimes it's absolutely not.

Such was the case this week when a parent at a St. Louis elementary school complained in a Facebook group about a book that was read to her 7-year-old. The parent wrote:

"Anyone else check out the read a loud book on Canvas for 2nd grade today? Ron's Big Mission was the book that was read out loud to my 7 year old. I caught this after she watched it bc I was working with my 3rd grader. I have called my daughters school. Parents, we have to preview what we are letting the kids see on there."

Keep Reading Show less

One night in 2018, Sheila and Steve Albers took their two youngest sons out to dinner. Their 17-year-old son, John, was in a crabby mood—not an uncommon occurrence for the teen who struggled with mental health issues—so he stayed home.

A half hour later, Sheila's started getting text messages that John wasn't safe. He had posted messages with suicidal ideations on social media and his friends had called the police to check on him. The Albers immediately raced home.

When they got there, they were met with a surreal scene. Their minivan was in the neighbor's yard across the street. John had been shot in the driver's seat six times by a police officer who had arrived to check on him. The officer had fired two shots as the teen slowly backed the van out of the garage, then 11 more after the van spun around backward. But all the officers told the Albers was that John had "passed" and had been shot. They wouldn't find out until the next day who had shot and killed him.

Keep Reading Show less