These 3 Stories From Veterans Just Gutted Me. The First 2 Were Hard To Watch. The 3rd Is Beautiful.

The Iraq War seemed so far away for so many people that it's easy to forget about the thousands of real human beings who served, fought, and died. These stories, though ... they really bring it home. There's a unique, unsentimental power to each of them. It's hard not to walk away changed. First up: "1st Squad, 3rd Platoon." Lance Cpl. Travis Williams tells the difficult story of a rescue mission with his squad — and the devastating aftermath.

“It’s hard, because I feel guilty for being the one guy left, but I also feel a responsibility. I better make sure everybody knows who these guys were, what these guys did.” — Lance Cpl. Travis Williams

“I am most proud of not blowing my head off by now. It’s just a whole lot easier if you’re dead. But that shouldn’t be your tribute to your dead friends. When they’re looking down on you, they don’t want you to be living in the moment that killed them. You made it. You got home. You should honor their memory by living the life that they didn’t get to live.” — Lance Cpl. Travis Williams


Next, Spc. Justin Cliburn tells the lovely and tragic story of a group of Iraqi children he befriended and what it means to truly love someone who doesn't speak your language.

“This was the first time I felt like I loved someone that wasn’t my family member.” — Spc. Justin Cliburn

“I don’t know what came of him. That’s the nature of war, I suppose. But whenever I see any footage from Baghdad, I’m always kind of looking around wondering if he’s in the frame.” — Spc. Justin Cliburn

Finally, Vietnam veteran Allen Hoe recalls a deeply moving conversation he had with a trauma nurse who treated his son shortly before he died. After all the tears I shed watching these, the uplifting ending was so wonderful.

“Now I never have to wonder about those last final moments.” — Allen Hoe

Just beautiful.

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Amy Johnson

The first day of school can be both exciting and scary at the same time — especially if it's your first day ever, as was the case for a nervous four-year-old in Wisconsin. But with a little help from a kind bus driver, he was able to get over his fear.

Axel was "super excited" waiting for the bus in Augusta with his mom, Amy Johnson, until it came time to actually get on.

"He was all smiles when he saw me around the corner and I started to slow down and that's when you could see his face start to change," his bus driver, Isabel "Izzy" Lane, told WEAU.

The scared boy wouldn't get on the bus without help from his mom, so she picked him up and carried him aboard, trying to give him a pep talk.

"He started to cling to me and I told him, 'Buddy, you got this and will have so much fun!'" Johnson told Fox 7.

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via Hollie Bellew-Shaw / Facebook

For those of us who are not on the spectrum, it can be hard to perceive the world through the senses of someone with autism.

"You could think of a person with autism as having an imbalanced set of senses," Stephen Shore, assistant professor in the School of Education at Adelphi University, told Web MD.

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A new Harriet Tubman statue sculpted by Emmy and Academy award-winner Wesley Wofford has been revealed, and its symbolism is moving to say the least.

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On an old episode of "The Oprah Winfrey Show" in July 1992, Oprah put her audience through a social experiment that puts racism in a new light. Despite being nearly two decades old, it's as relevant today as ever.

She split the audience members into two groups based on their eye color. Those with brown eyes were given preferential treatment by getting to cut the line and given refreshments while they waited to be seated. Those with blue eyes were made to put on a green collar and wait in a crowd for two hours.

Staff were instructed to be extra polite to brown-eyed people and to discriminate against blue-eyed people. Her guest for that day's show was diversity expert Jane Elliott, who helped set up the experiment and played along, explaining that brown-eyed people were smarter than blue-eyed people.

Watch the video to see how this experiment plays out.

Oprah's Social Experiment on Her Audience www.youtube.com

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