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The Most Beautiful Way To Stop A Bully I've Ever Seen

This guy started out as a bully. Where he ended up will surprise you. It surprised the TED audience too, so they went ahead and gave him a rousing standing ovation. It's worth watching every single inspirational minute of this.


  • At 1:10, he talks about the unfair question grown-ups always asked when we were kids.
  • At 1:41, he walks through his career choices.
  • At 2:11, some adults tell him something awful.
  • At 3:00, he decides on an impossible career.
  • At 3:48, he blows my mind.
  • At 4:50, he quotes an line from a cartoon. I never knew how epic that line was.
  • At 6:00, the audience realizes something tragic and funny.
  • At 7:36, he rips my heart out.
  • At 8:41, something awful is said.
  • At 9:15, he preaches the truth.
  • At 10:00, he has a message to every kid who was ever bullied.
  • At 10:49, you have to do what he says.
  • At 11:28, he gets to the beautiful, beautiful point. And everybody gives him a standing ovation.

You can see the original version of his beautiful animated poem here. You can buy it here. And you can share his inspiring message by clicking the share buttons below.

A viral video from a Little League game has people celebrating good sportsmanship.

Youth sports have gotten more intensely competitive, to the point where overeager parents and coaches have to regularly be reminded to take it down a notch. So when humanity takes precedence over team rivalries, it's extra heartwarming.

And considering how many "kids these days" laments we see coming from older generations, it's also heartening to see kids showing excellent character qualities when no one directly asked them to.

A viral video from a Little League baseball game is giving us a nice dose of both—good sportsmanship and basic human kindness from two players from opposing teams.

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An MTV News video shows how much gymnastics has evolved over the decades.

In 1952, a 25-year-old medical student did what people had said was impossible. Roger Bannister made history when he ran a mile in under four minutes, shifting the sports world and challenging our ideas about the limits of athletic performance.

Since then, countless records have been set in every sport people play. We keep getting better and better, and just when we think someone has surely reached the pinnacle, someone else comes along to push the limit even further.

One sporting event where such constant improvement is made crystal clear is gymnastics. I remember how enthralled we all were with Mary Lou Retton's perfect 10 vaults when I was a kid, and now they look fairly basic. (Not to take anything away from her—at the time it was truly amazing, and she did execute them flawlessly.)

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Pop Culture

Guy makes a tweet about what you should have 'by age 30.' People's responses were hilarious.

"By the age of 30 you should have anxiety, and an emotional support pet that also has anxiety."

Photo by NIPYATA! on Unsplash

This is 30.

When Steve Adcock, an entrepreneur and “fitness buff” posted this to his Twitter:

“By age 30, you should have a group of friends that talk business, money, and fitness, not politics and pop culture.”

… people had thoughts.



His post might have been intended as more of an encouragement to surround yourself with people who challenge your current mindset, considering the tweet continued with “one of the biggest mistakes I've ever made was making friends with like-minded folks who talked about the same [stuff] over and over. I agreed with 99% of it. Your comfort zone will kill your progress.”

But still, overall the tweet left an unsavory taste in people’s mouths—primarily because it implied that money was somehow a better conversation topic than what people are usually genuinely passionate about. Why not talk about your favorite television show with friends if it lights you up inside?


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