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The BB gun was still in the packaging, ​but they still killed him. I wish this story shocked me.

It feels like every day there's a new story featuring an unarmed black person being gunned down and killed because they looked "scary." What's worse: These stories are too often supported by lies and there aren't any consequences. As this Twitter story from Shaun King shows, this isn't exactly a new trend.* If you aren't able to see the tweets below, try clicking "view slideshow"

The BB gun was still in the packaging, ​but they still killed him. I wish this story shocked me.

Two little things worth calling out here:

Shaun incorrectly mentions three men tortured and killed Emmett Till and were later found not guilty.Emmett Till was killed and tortured by two men who were found not guilty. The men lied and said Till had a wallet full of pictures of white women he was going to victimize, but they'd burned it.


As of September 2014, Officer Darren Wilson (who shot and killed Mike Brown on Aug. 9, 2014, in Ferguson, Missouri) has not been arrested or charged with any crime. But there is currently a grand jury in process. The grand jury has until Jan. 7, 2015, todecide whether charges will be brought against Wilson for Brown's death.

If you're not caught up on all the stories mentioned in this Storify, you're in luck. Here's some background:

Kendrec McDade, an unarmed teen, was shot and killed by police in Pasadena, California, in 2012. A friend believed he'd stolen his laptop, so he told police Kendrec was armed with gun "so they'd move quicker."


Ronald Ritchie admits to lying when he said John Crawford was pointing a gun at people in Walmart. When police arrived on the scene, Crawford was shot and killed from behind. He was holding a BB gun still in the packaging that he'd picked up in the store.
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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.