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Terminally ill 7-year-old gets his Halloween wish granted and fights off the walking dead.

His mission: Live a day as a hero in the middle of a zombie attack.

Terminally ill 7-year-old gets his Halloween wish granted and fights off the walking dead.

Civilization has collapsed. Supplies are scarce. Oh yeah, and there are a bunch of undead, flesh-eating creatures roaming around every corner — and they're coming after you.

The zombie apocalypse has become a popular fantasy these days.


That's thanks in no small part to the success of "The Walking Dead," which has been, ahem, killing it for years, and its spinoff series, "Fear the Walking Dead." But most of us won't have a chance to put our encyclopedic knowledge of the undead to practical use.

Then again, most of us aren't Spencer Holt.

Somebody call a hero? Photo by Pasco Sheriff's Office, used with permission.



The 7-year-old boy from Pasco County, Florida, got to do what many of us secretly wish we could try: living a day as a hero in the middle of a zombie attack.

Spencer is battling a terminal mitochondrial disease that has no known cure. With doctors unable to establish any firm timeline of what lies in store for him, he and his family are simply taking life one step at a time, hoping that tomorrow brings better news than the day before.

Thanks to a few kindhearted deputies, he received exactly that last week in the form of a day spent living out his fantasy as a real-life Rick Grimes.

Watcha gonna do when he comes for you? Photo by Pasco Sheriff's Office, used with permission.

After receiving a call from Pasco County Sheriff Chris Nocco inviting him down to the station, Spencer — a lover of all things law enforcement and zombie-related — was whisked away to the sheriff's office with a full motorcade escort in tow.

Before he could even begin to make heads or tails of the situation, he was informed that an army of zombies (played by local high school drama students) had infiltrated the facility.

Insert “Me before my morning coffee" joke here. Photo by Pasco Sheriff's Office, used with permission.

"We're overrun, buddy. We need your help. We need a team leader out there," Nocco told the boy as he adorned him with an official badge. "This is going to be an important day."

With a NERF dart gun in his hand and a troop of SWAT members and K-9 units providing backup, Spencer proceeded to dispatch any and every zombie threat facing the jail with sniper-like precision.

When all was said and done, Spencer was treated to two more surprises.

The first: a “Thriller"-inspired victory dance from several on-duty officers (a reference that I'm pretty confident was a little before his time).

GIF via WFLA News Channel 8.

The second: a minivan, donated to Spencer's family by a local roofing company to help transport him around.

Spencer's mother, Cher, was overwhelmed by the generous gestures. "This is what I treasure, the good days," she said. “Make the most memories of every day because no one is promised tomorrow."

Watch the action here, courtesy of Fox 13 News:

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Frito-Lay

Did you know one in five families are unable to provide everyday essentials and food for their children? This summer was also the hungriest on record with one in four children not knowing where their next meal will come from – an increase from one in seven children prior to the pandemic. The effects of COVID-19 continue to be felt around the country and many people struggle to secure basic needs. Unemployment is at an all-time high and an alarming number of families face food insecurity, not only from the increased financial burdens but also because many students and families rely on schools for school meal programs and other daily essentials.

This school year is unlike any other. Frito-Lay knew the critical need to ensure children have enough food and resources to succeed. The company quickly pivoted to expand its partnership with Feed the Children, a leading nonprofit focused on alleviating childhood hunger, to create the "Building the Future Together" program to provide shelf-stable food to supplement more than a quarter-million meals and distribute 500,000 pantry staples, school supplies, snacks, books, hand sanitizer, and personal care items to schools in underserved communities.

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It also helps when someone upends a stereotype by saying or doing something unexpected.

Fair or not, certain parts of the U.S. are associated with certain cultural assumptions, perhaps none more pinholed than the rural south. When we hear Appalachia, a certain stereotype probably pops up in our minds—probably white, probably not well educated, probably racist. Even if there is some basis to a stereotype, we must always remember that human beings can never be painted with such broad strokes.

Enter Tyler Childers, a rising country music star whose old-school country fiddling has endeared him to a broad audience, but his new album may have a different kind of reach. "Long Violent History" was released Friday, along with a video message to his white rural fans explaining the culminating track by the same name. Watch it here:

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$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


The legality of abortion is one of the most polarized debates in America—but it doesn’t have to be.

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@frajds / Twitter

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Father Schrenk was making his nightly walk of the church grounds to make sure everything was fine before retiring to the rectory, when he found a car parked by itself in front of the school.

Curious, he looked inside the car and saw a note that made his "blood run cold" attached to the steering wheel. "Look in trunk!" the note read. What made it extra creepy was that the two Os in "look" had smiley faces.

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