Stunning photos of the Olympic mural that might break records in Rio.

Turns out, you don't have to be an athlete to break records in Rio during the Olympics.

Eduardo Kobra. Photo by Christophe Simone/Getty Images.

World-renowned street artist Eduardo Kobra may soon break one of his own with the 30,000-square-foot mural he painted on the Olympic Boulevard in Rio.


All you have to do is see a part of it to know why it's such a feat:

Part of Kobra's mural in Rio. Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images.

It's so big, the whole thing won't even fit in one photo.

The mural is about 50 feet tall and 620 feet long, and it took Kobra three months to complete.

GIF via Emerson Oliveira/YouTube.

It's called "Etnias," which is Portuguese for "ethnicities" — a fitting title considering the multicultural event it's honoring.

Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images.

“We’re living through a very confusing time with a lot of conflict. I wanted to show that everyone is united,” Kobra told Rio2016 News.

Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images.

He achieved this unifying effect by beautifully painting the faces of indigenous people from five continents around the world on the building's facade.

Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images.

Now it looks like Kobra will snag a much-sought accolade for his hard work: a world record for the largest mural painted by one artist.

Kobra painting "Etnias." Photo by Christophe Simone/Getty Images.

Kobra had assistance from four guest artists to complete the mural, but if his work makes the grade, the mural will surpass the current record holder — Mexican artist Ernesto Rocha's mural — by over 5,505 square feet. That's almost double the size, people. This guy is in it to win it.

Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images.

You might recognize Kobra's signature style if you've visited one of 20 countries where his murals appear, including the U.S., Russia, the U.K., Brazil, Japan, Switzerland, France, Greece, and Italy.

Kobra got his start painting murals for the police ... after they arrested him.

Kobra grew up in Sao Paulo but loved graffiti far more than going to class. After getting expelled, he was arrested for vandalizing property, but the judge was so impressed with his work that he sentenced him to continue it on the wall of the police station.

You know what they say: From humble beginnings come great things. Kobra is no exception.

💫

A photo posted by Eduardo Kobra 🇧🇷 (@kobrastreetart) on

Photo by AFP/Getty Images.

Mural em Andamento em Tokyo / Work in Progress Tokyo #kobra #eduardokobra #Tokyo #riodejaneiro #rio

A photo posted by Eduardo Kobra 🇧🇷 (@kobrastreetart) on

Kobra's murals bring vibrant life wherever they appear. As such, his mural in Rio is the perfect complement to the Olympic walkway, where visitors from all over the world come together to cheer on their athletes.

Whether it breaks the record or not, Kobra's unifying artwork has already earned bragging rights.

Check out a video on how the Olympic mural was made here:

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