Stunning photos of the Olympic mural that might break records in Rio.

Turns out, you don't have to be an athlete to break records in Rio during the Olympics.

Eduardo Kobra. Photo by Christophe Simone/Getty Images.

World-renowned street artist Eduardo Kobra may soon break one of his own with the 30,000-square-foot mural he painted on the Olympic Boulevard in Rio.


All you have to do is see a part of it to know why it's such a feat:

Part of Kobra's mural in Rio. Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images.

It's so big, the whole thing won't even fit in one photo.

The mural is about 50 feet tall and 620 feet long, and it took Kobra three months to complete.

GIF via Emerson Oliveira/YouTube.

It's called "Etnias," which is Portuguese for "ethnicities" — a fitting title considering the multicultural event it's honoring.

Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images.

“We’re living through a very confusing time with a lot of conflict. I wanted to show that everyone is united,” Kobra told Rio2016 News.

Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images.

He achieved this unifying effect by beautifully painting the faces of indigenous people from five continents around the world on the building's facade.

Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images.

Now it looks like Kobra will snag a much-sought accolade for his hard work: a world record for the largest mural painted by one artist.

Kobra painting "Etnias." Photo by Christophe Simone/Getty Images.

Kobra had assistance from four guest artists to complete the mural, but if his work makes the grade, the mural will surpass the current record holder — Mexican artist Ernesto Rocha's mural — by over 5,505 square feet. That's almost double the size, people. This guy is in it to win it.

Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images.

You might recognize Kobra's signature style if you've visited one of 20 countries where his murals appear, including the U.S., Russia, the U.K., Brazil, Japan, Switzerland, France, Greece, and Italy.

Kobra got his start painting murals for the police ... after they arrested him.

Kobra grew up in Sao Paulo but loved graffiti far more than going to class. After getting expelled, he was arrested for vandalizing property, but the judge was so impressed with his work that he sentenced him to continue it on the wall of the police station.

You know what they say: From humble beginnings come great things. Kobra is no exception.

💫

A photo posted by Eduardo Kobra 🇧🇷 (@kobrastreetart) on

Photo by AFP/Getty Images.

Mural em Andamento em Tokyo / Work in Progress Tokyo #kobra #eduardokobra #Tokyo #riodejaneiro #rio

A photo posted by Eduardo Kobra 🇧🇷 (@kobrastreetart) on

Kobra's murals bring vibrant life wherever they appear. As such, his mural in Rio is the perfect complement to the Olympic walkway, where visitors from all over the world come together to cheer on their athletes.

Whether it breaks the record or not, Kobra's unifying artwork has already earned bragging rights.

Check out a video on how the Olympic mural was made here:

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

Ready for the weekend? Of course, you are. Here's our weekly dose of good vibes to help you shed the stresses of the workweek and put yourself in a great frame of mind.

These 10 stories made us happy this week because they feature amazing creativity, generosity, and one super-cute fish.

1. Diver befriends a fish with the cutest smile

Hawaiian underwater photographer Yuki Nakano befriended a friendly porcupine fish and now they hang out regularly.

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