Stephen Colbert claims Trump will 'win' the Super Bowl in hilarious monologue.

On Feb. 1, 2018, President Donald Trump tweeted that his first State of the Union was the most watched in history.

"Thank you for all of the nice compliments and reviews," he wrote. "Delivered from the heart!"

The problem, of course, is that this claim is verifiably false.

As New York Magazine pointed out, fewer people watched Trump's State of the Union than the first addresses given by the previous three presidents. Even Fox News(!) published a tweet debunking the president's claim.


Whether it's TV ratings or inauguration crowd sizes, the president seems fixated on proving his were the biggest, best there were — even when the facts so clearly say otherwise. It's a strange need Stephen Colbert pointed out on his "Late Show" monologue on Feb. 1.

"First, that’s not true," Colbert panned after reading Trump's State of the Union tweet aloud. "Second, it’s a lie."

After pointing out that other presidents have had higher-rated addresses, Colbert reasoned:

"Look, it doesn’t matter how many people watched. But what does matter is that the president needs to lie about it, and then somehow get away with it. This is the new world we live in."

Photo by Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images.

Does Trump really believe lying — on issues of very little importance, no less — is sound political strategy?

Because it doesn't seem like the president's thought this one through.

His public statement file by the nonpartisan fact-checking organization PolitiFact is littered with "mostly false," "false," and "pants on fire!" ratings. In his first year in office, Trump made over 2,000 false or misleading claims according to The Washington Post, which pointed out the president often doubles down on his most dubious points many, many times; like his administration's ability to build an inexpensive border wall with Mexico in under one year (nope, not feasible).

You might be tempted to credit Trump's lying if it were fooling the American public to his advantage. But it's not. Just one-third of American voters considered Trump "trustworthy," according to a Politico/Morning Consult poll published last October — a figure that falls in line with his historically dismal approval numbers.

Colbert, however, is leaning into Trump's obsession with always "winning" — even when it completely bends the truth.

"Let me just say right now in advance," Colbert concluded in his criticism Thursday night. "Congratulations to President Trump on winning the Super Bowl! Well played.” 😂

Watch Colbert's opening monologue from Feb. 2 below:

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

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This article originally appeared on 10.23.15


Getting people who don't suffer from anxiety issues to understand them is hard.

People have tried countless metaphors and methods to describe what panic and anxiety is like. But putting it into the context of a living nightmare, haunted house style, is one of the more effective ways I've ever seen it done.

Brenna Twohy delivered the riveting poetic analogy recently in Oakland, starting out by going off about some funny "Goosebumps" plots. It's lovely, funny, sweet, and relatable, and it's totally worth the short time to watch.

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."