+

Any new mom can tell you taking a baby to the pool can be pretty stressful. The last thing you need is input from strangers about how you look in a bikini.

But that's exactly what happened to Lexi Sinclair who, while cooling off at the pool with her son Christian, had a strange and jarring interaction.

According to Lexi, an older woman came up to her while she was rubbing sunscreen on her son (every parent's favorite activity!) and, after some small talk, suggested maybe Lexi ought to stick with wearing a one-piece bathing suit for a while, as her body is still "recovering."


Lexi says the woman told her that "the men at the pool would feel more comfortable if I was in a one-piece swim suit because a bikini isn't appropriate for a mother."

Lexi kept a cool head and delivered a polite but brilliant retort. She later recapped the exchange on Facebook for the world to see:

So today I took my 4 month old son to the pool. While putting Christians pool hat on, a woman (maybe mid 50s) comes up...

Posted by Lexi Sinclair on Tuesday, August 2, 2016

Here's the full text of Lexi's post:

So today I took my 4 month old son to the pool. While putting Christians pool hat on, a woman (maybe mid 50s) comes up and makes conversation with me about Christian. Asking me his age, how much he weighs, how he sleeps, etc.

She then proceeded to tell me that the men at the pool would feel more comfortable if I was in a one-piece swim suit because a bikini isn't appropriate for a mother, especially one who's "still recovering." Anyone who knows me knows I had a few words for this crazy, ballsy woman.

But instead I just smiled, kissed my son and told her, "I'm proud of my body. In just one year I've gained 50 pounds, and lost 37. I've grown a human and given birth to a beautiful miracle. My body provided food for my child. So, no, my body might not be the best sight for other men to see. My stretch marks and tummy pudge might not be sexy. But they're proof that I've done something amazing, and I have a man that loves me and finds me even sexier and more beautiful now. To be honest, I don't give a tiny rats ass what other men, or a prissy twit like you think. Have a nice day though."



The response to Lexi's story has been massive, and it's a great reminder that looking and feeling beautiful has nothing to do with what strangers think.

Lexi says the response — over 24,000 shares and counting — has been completely unexpected. And while some of the comments have been rude and out of place (hey, this is still the internet we're talking about), her story has resonated positively with a lot of people.

"I've gotten responses from both ends of the spectrum. Everything from women telling me how much I've inspired them and men telling me its made them appreciate their wives even more," she said in an email.

"I just want other mommies to remember that it's all about how you see yourself, not how others see you. We're supposed to be raising our children to love themselves no matter what, and that should start with us."

This article originally appeared on 09.06.17


Being married is like being half of a two-headed monster. It's impossible to avoid regular disagreements when you're bound to another person for the rest of your life. Even the perfect marriage (if there was such a thing) would have its daily frustrations. Funnily enough, most fights aren't caused by big decisions but the simple, day-to-day questions, such as "What do you want for dinner?"; "Are we free Friday night?"; and "What movie do you want to see?"

Here are some hilarious tweets that just about every married couple will understand.

Keep ReadingShow less
Democracy

A man told me gun laws would create more 'soft targets.' He summed up the whole problem.

As far as I know, there are only two places in the world where people living their lives are referred to as 'soft targets.'

Photo by Taylor Wilcox on Unsplash

Only in America are kids in classrooms referred to as "soft targets."

On the Fourth of July, a gunman opened fire at a parade in quaint Highland Park, Illinois, killing at least six people, injuring dozens and traumatizing (once again) an entire nation.

My family member who was at the parade was able to flee to safety, but the trauma of what she experienced will linger. For the toddler with the blood-soaked sock, carried to safety by a stranger after being pulled from under his father's bullet-torn body, life will never be the same.

There's a phrase I keep seeing in debates over gun violence, one that I can't seem to shake from my mind. After the Uvalde school shooting, I shared my thoughts on why arming teachers is a bad idea, and a gentleman responded with this brief comment:

"Way to create more soft targets."

Keep ReadingShow less

Paul Rudd in 2016.

Passing around your yearbook to have it signed by friends, teachers and classmates is a fun rite of passage for kids in junior high and high school. But, according to KDVR, for Brody Ridder, a bullied sixth grader at The Academy of Charter Schools in Westminster, Colorado, it was just another day of putting up with rejection.

Poor Brody was only able to get four signatures in his yearbook, two from what appeared to be teachers and one from himself that said, “Hope you make some more friends."

Brody’s mom, Cassandra Ridder has been devastated by the bullying her son has faced over the past two years. "There [are] kids that have pushed him and called him names," she told The Washington Post. It has to be terrible to have your child be bullied and there is nothing you can do.

She posted about the incident on Facebook.

“My poor son. Doesn’t seem like it’s getting any better. 2 teachers and a total of 2 students wrote in his yearbook,” she posted on Facebook. “Despite Brody asking all kinds of kids to sign it. So Brody took it upon himself to write to himself. My heart is shattered. Teach your kids kindness.”

Keep ReadingShow less