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Shrimp in London are pumped full of cocaine. It's even worse than it sounds.

Listen, the world is dark and full of unexpected environmental terrors. Climate change is real, coral is being destroyed at a rate so alarming that I now care about coral, and if it weren't for these polyamorous birds living their best lives, I sometimes feel like I might lose it in the middle of the supermarket. And don't even get me started on the people out there who think that the world is flat and that the earth isn't getting dangerously warmer because the eastern states "sure do get a lot of snow."

Now we've got to bring shrimp snorting (read: being polluted with)  cocaine into the equation of why our planet is on a really messed up trajectory towards Hadestown (like actual hell and not the hit Broadway musical*).


"Wait," you say, "let's get back to that shrimp snorting premium drugs thing."

Well, okay, but you asked.

The story is this: Researchers at King's College in London and The University of Suffolk wanted to see what chemicals they'd find floating through the rivers in the region. And while they should be commended for sticking to the bodies of waters they're used to (don't go chasing those waterfalls, science friends), what they found was that freshwater shrimp, for some reason, were chock full of cocaine.

[rebelmouse-image 19469961 dam="1" original_size="449x247" caption="OH NO, SEBASTIAN! Gif via GIPHY." expand=1]OH NO, SEBASTIAN! Gif via GIPHY.

What's even more distressing than finding out that shellfish — who should just be living a cool, calm existence before being devoured in a "nature is horrible and beautiful" way — were "carrying," is the fact that it's likely they have full trench coats of the stuff on them. The shrimp also tested positive for ketamine among other illicit substances (which include pesticides that have long been banned).

While scientists weren't looking to narc on the freshwater dwellers — they were researching how wildlife responded to micropollutants — the new findings are worrying. Though environmental scientists are mainly focused on the preponderance of microplastics in the water (because fish ingest that and then so do humans), this new finding suggests that we need to do an even better job of keeping our waterways clean. If not for us, then at least for the poor shrimp that likely have no idea why they want to rock and roll all night and party every day.**

*Can you get us tickets, though?

**Scientists say the shrimp are not in too much danger right now (phew!) but this is a warning bell!!

via FIRST

FIRST students learn real-world career skills through robotics competitions.

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In today’s rapidly changing world, most parents are concerned about what the future looks like for their children. Whether concerning technology, culture, or values, young people today are expected to navigate—and attempt to thrive in—a society that’s far more complicated than that of their parents. It’s one of the reasons why parents are keen to involve their kids in activities that will help them become more resilient, well-rounded and better prepared for life when they enter adulthood.

One such activity is FIRST®, a volunteer-based global robotics community that helps young people discover a passion for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) through exciting, multifaceted challenges. FIRST helps kids ages 4 to 18 to build confidence, resilience, cooperation and empathy as they compete and collaborate with one another.

You may have seen the transformative power of FIRST programs featured in the new 2022 Disney+ documentary “More Than Robots.”

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via Pexels

Three people engaged in conversation at a party.

There are some people who live under the illusion that everything they say is deeply interesting and have no problem wasting your time by rambling on and on without a sign of stopping. They’re the relative, neighbor or co-worker who can’t take a hint that the conversation is over.

Of all these people, the co-worker who can’t stop talking may be the most challenging because you see them every day in a professional setting that requires politeness.

There are many reasons that some people talk excessively. Therapist F. Diane Barth writes in Psychology Today that some people talk excessively because they don’t have the ability to process complex auditory signals, so they ramble on without recognizing the subtle cues others are sending.

It may also be a case of someone who thinks they’re the most interesting person in the conversation.

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Obsolete pesticides excavated from landfills.

A shocking report released last month by Pesticide Action Network (PAN) Europe found that over the past nine years there has been a 53% rise in contamination of the most hazardous pesticides in European fresh fruits.

The analysis of more than 97,000 fruit samples found that nearly one-half of all blackberries and one-third of apples had toxic pesticide residue. These pesticides have been linked to serious illnesses such as birth defects, cancer and heart disease.

At the same time, Reuters reports that intensive “farming, forestry and urbanisation are fuelling the degradation of natural habitats” adding that most of Europe’s protected “species have a negative conservation status.”

In an effort to dramatically reduce the volume of pesticides in the bloc’s food supply and rehabilitate its natural habitat, the European Commission has proposed dramatic new environmental targets. The first would reduce the use of chemical pesticides across the EU 50% by 2030. Pesticides would also be banned for use in public parks and protected areas.

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John Cena showed up for a family who fled Mariupol, Ukraine, after their house was destroyed in the Russian invasion.

Since Russia invaded Ukraine nearly four months ago, more than 13 million Ukrainians have fled their homeland. Some cities, such as Mariupol, have been completely destroyed—"reduced to a wasteland littered with bodies," according to an explainer in Reuters—and may be uninhabitable for the foreseeable future.

Many families fled early in the war, when the danger became clear. But not everyone understood why they were leaving.

Children are befuddled by war, as they should be. It is nonsensical, illogical and unbelievable to think that you must leave your home and move to a country far away because a grown-up who is supposed to be a leader is trying to blow up your house. People with intellectual disabilities may also not understand a sudden uprooting, especially when the reason is something even fully abled adults struggle to make sense of.

When Liana Rohozhyn's home in Mariupol was destroyed earlier in the war, she and her family were forced to flee. Her son Misha, a nonverbal 19-year-old with Down syndrome, was understandably distressed about having to leave Ukraine. To comfort him through the long journey across Europe to safety, Liana told Misha they were going on a trip to find the champion wrestler, John Cena.

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