She's the heroine of the Star Wars universe, so why was she erased from this children's shirt?

"Star Wars" is not just a film series, it's a cultural touchstone.

People know the canon inside and out. Fans dissect every intimate detail, and pass the nostalgia and wonder down to their children like a prized heirloom.


Fans celebrating the release of new "Star Wars: The Force Awakens" merchandise. Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images.

So when anyone messes with the canon, it's not going to go unnoticed.

And someone really should've told that to Target. Because the megastore is now the target (pardon the pun) of some serious, and completely justified, nerdrage.

GIF from "30 Rock."

It all started when Target released a T-shirt in its boys' department featuring a scene from the first "Star Wars" film.

The tee has a still from the iconic scene in "Star Wars: A New Hope" in which Darth Vader points an accusatory finger at Princess Leia while aboard her ship. It's one of the few scenes the pair have together, and this scene in particular has been meme'd beyond recognition. Everybody knows it.

So imagine everyone's surprise when Princess Leia was replaced Luke Skywalker on the T-shirt.



In case your memory is fuzzy, Luke Skywalker wasn't in that scene at all. Neither were the storm troopers, but the original guy behind Vader kind of steals focus, so that swap makes sense. But to completely erase Princess Leia's existence in favor of a male character who wasn't even there? C'mon, Target. What were you even thinking?

Naturally, the Internet got wind of the unnecessary edit and gave Target a piece of its collective mind.

Fans, nerds, parents, and anyone sick and tired of the way women are often erased in the media fired back at Target for the glaring misstep.



Aaaaand Target offered a tepid response.


But as of this writing, the shirt is still available for purchase on their site.

This story is bigger than a child's T-shirt. The issue of "female erasure" is all too common.

Contributions from women are overlooked or ignored altogether, and sadly, it often happens in toys and media targeted to children. Especially when the toys are considered "boy toys" because of a weird assumption that boys won't wear or play with things featuring female characters.

Earlier in 2015, two different "Avengers: Age of Ultron" toy sets made headlines for replacing Black Widow with Captain America on the motorcycle that she rides in the movie. Poof! Gone! She wasn't even invited to the party!

Merchandise for "Guardians of the Galaxy," another Marvel property, was also widely criticized for purposefully removing the sole female Guardian, Gamora, from the team.

Photo by iStock.

It's also a little disheartening to see Target, who abandoned gender-based signage in the toy area in favor of an all-inclusive shopping experience, erase Princess Leia from her own story. It bears repeating: C'mon Target!

It benefits all kids to see dynamic, active, adventurous female characters in their stories.

For example, one study found that, across 333 speaking characters shown in professional roles in G-rated films, 80.5% were men and 19.5% were female. The fact that merchandise would then erase those roles when it comes time to make the toy set or T-shirt is just insulting — not to mention it sets a harmful example for what it means to be a woman on a team.

Parents are begging for alternatives to Barbie and princesses for their daughters. What will it take to get Hollywood and retailers to listen?

Photo by iStock.

Courtesy of Verizon
True

If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

via CNN / Twitter

Eviction seemed imminent for Dasha Kelly, 32, and her three young daughters Sharron, 8; Kia, 6; and Imani, 5, on Monday. The eviction moratorium expired over the weekend and it looked like there was no way for them to avoid becoming homeless.

The former Las Vegas card dealer lost her job due to casino closures during the pandemic and needed $2,000 to cover her back rent. The mother of three couldn't bear the thought of being put out of her apartment with three children in the scorching Nevada desert.

"I had no idea what we were going to do," Kelly said, according to KOAT.

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