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She studied feminism before it was cool. Decades later, we all have her to thank for that.

"Men have been given the impression that they are much more important in the world than they actually are."

She studied feminism before it was cool. Decades later, we all have her to thank for that.

Wait. Did one of the first famous feminist professors just point out we need to be more thoughtful about ... men?

Yeah, and she had a point. A very feminist and spot-on point.

Late historian Gerda Lerner was saying badass things on gender equality long before Beyoncé danced on stage in front of big letters proclaiming she was a "feminist." (But we love you, too, Bey.)


Take, for instance, this interview she had with "Thinking Allowed." It's chock-full of great tidbits that put sexism into perspective.

One of the most important talking points she touches on is the fact men are hurt by sexism, too.

"[The omission of women's history] has fostered illusions of grandeur in every man that are unwarranted. If you can think as a man that everything great in the world and civilization was created by men, then naturally you have to look down on women. And naturally you have to have different aspirations for your sons and for your daughters. And I don't think that's good for men either."

Lerner explored many issues within the topic of gender, including when women began being treated like second-class citizens. FYI, she discovered it was an embarrassingly long time ago.

We're talking the Bronze Age.



GIF via NBC.

Lerner was a pioneer when it came to empowering women.

She was a leading force in the field of women's history and an accomplished author who wrote about the patriarchy (a system where men basically hold the power and women sit on the sidelines).

To put things in perspective, women's history wasn't even a thing when she started studying it, as she explained on "Thinking Allowed" in the interview clip below.

"When I started working on women's history about 30 years ago, the field did not exist. It was not recognized. People didn't think that women had a history worth knowing."

But thanks to trailblazers like her, many more people think women deserve a seat at the table. A Vox poll published in April found 85% of Americans believe in "equality for women." (And the other 15% are wrong, but that's just my opinion).

Society owes you one, Gerda.

Check out the a clip of the interview below:

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.