She carried her mattress to protest her rape. A nation joins her — for the second time.

You might have heard of Emma Sulkowicz.

Back in October 2014, Emma's performance art project inspired college students across the nation to carry mattresses for a day to show their support for survivors of campus sexual assault.

It was called Carry That Weight Day of Action.


April 13, 2015, was a second day of action.

Image via Facebook

Why are these college kids protesting so much? Wasn't that first protest enough?

Actually, no. Far from it. There are so many reasons we need to keep talking about rape and sexual assault on campus. But one of them is particularly shocking:

106 colleges and universities have fallen short of helping survivors.

As of April 6, 2015, 106 colleges and universities were under investigation for violating Title IX because of how they handled cases of sexual assault on their campuses.

Unfortunately, far too many colleges care more about P.R. than survivors.

In early 2015, theaters began showing the documentary "The Hunting Ground." The film highlights the accounts of survivors whose colleges told them to stay quiet about their assaults or denied them justice. We may never know how many victims have experience this same injustice, but their stories are far too common.

So rather than wondering why college students have to protest so darn much or assuming they're youngsters making a big deal out of nothing, let's wonder why survivors still have to run into their perpetrators as they walk from class to class.

And let's show some support for the young people who are trying to make change happen on their college campuses.

We don't have to be college students to help them carry that weight — literally and figuratively.

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Davina Agudelo was born in Miami, Florida, but she grew up in Medellín, Colombia.

"I am so grateful for my upbringing in Colombia, surrounded by mountains and mango trees, and for my Colombian family," Agudelo says. "Colombia is the place where I learned what's truly essential in life." It's also where she found her passion for the arts.

While she was growing up, Colombia was going through a violent drug war, and Agudelo turned to literature, theater, singing, and creative writing as a refuge. "Journaling became a sacred practice, where I could leave on the page my dreams & longings as well as my joy and sadness," she says. "During those years, poetry came to me naturally. My grandfather was a poet and though I never met him, maybe there is a little bit of his love for poetry within me."

In 1998, when she left her home and everyone she loved and moved to California, the arts continued to be her solace and comfort. She got her bachelor's degree in theater arts before getting certified in journalism at UCLA. It was there she realized the need to create a media platform that highlighted the positive contributions of LatinX in the US.

"I know the power that storytelling and writing our own stories have and how creative writing can aid us in our own transformation."

In 2012, she started Alegría Magazine and it was a great success. Later, she refurbished a van into a mobile bookstore to celebrate Latin American and LatinX indie authors and poets, while also encouraging children's reading and writing in low-income communities across Southern California.

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via Grahame / Flickr, @imeyrick / TikTok

The UK is experiencing record-breaking weather this week. England reached its hottest temperature of the year on Tuesday when it hit 32.2°C at Heathrow Airport in west London. Temperatures in Northern Ireland reached an all-time high when 31.3°C was recorded at Castlederg the next day.

However, when you translate Celsius to Fahrenheit, the temperatures don't seem to be that extreme, at least to an American. Thirty-two degrees celsius is only 89.6° F. When you compare the temperatures in the UK to an average July day in Las Vegas, Nevada where it'll hit 107°F, the British seem a little weak.

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