If you're a parent who's sick of the damsels-in-distress trope, a new fantasy kids' book is probably right up your alley.

[rebelmouse-image 19532173 dam="1" original_size="750x536" caption="Image by "Maiden Voyage"/Kickstarter." expand=1]Image by "Maiden Voyage"/Kickstarter.

"Maiden Voyage" begins when Ru inherits her fisherman father's mysterious map. Curious, she sets sail on Captain Freya's boat, and the two fend off pirates and a wicked queen as they conquer the high seas — falling for each other in the process.


[rebelmouse-image 19532174 dam="1" original_size="750x1050" caption="Ru and Captain Freya. Image by "Maiden Voyage"/Kickstarter." expand=1]Ru and Captain Freya. Image by "Maiden Voyage"/Kickstarter.

The story, aimed at 5- to 10-year-olds, is already creating buzz online, drawing praise from celebrities like George Takei and Sir Ian McKellen for filling an egregious void in kids' lit.

The tale features interracial, same-gender love, which is far too uncommon in children's literature.

"It’s important for young people to feel included, that they have a place in the world and something they can relate to," Jaimee Poipoi, who identifies as Takatāpui (a Māori term used to describe same-gender attraction), said in a statement. She co-authored the book alongside fellow LGBTQ New Zealanders Chaz Harris and Adam Reynolds.

[rebelmouse-image 19532175 dam="1" original_size="750x469" caption="Authors Adam Reynolds, Chaz Harris, and Jaimee Poipoi. Image by "Maiden Voyage"/Kickstarter." expand=1]Authors Adam Reynolds, Chaz Harris, and Jaimee Poipoi. Image by "Maiden Voyage"/Kickstarter.

"Maiden Voyage" is the follow-up to Harris and Reynolds' "Promised Land," a love story about a prince and farm boy that went viral last year.

Along with highlighting LGBTQ characters, another inspiration behind "Maiden Voyage" was curbing the gender imbalance so prevalent in children's media.

A 2011 Florida State University study found that of 6,000 picture books published between 1990–2000, no more than 33% of the stories in any given year featured a female character. (Male characters appeared in 100%.)

Changing the way women and girls are portrayed in books was important too, Harris noted: "As with our first book, we wanted to avoid the ‘damsels in distress’ trope and continue being inclusive of people of color who are still hugely underrepresented in children’s books."

"Girls need to grow up knowing they can be a powerful queen, a brave sea captain, or anything else they set their minds to," Harris said.

[rebelmouse-image 19532176 dam="1" original_size="750x453" caption="Farm boy Jack and Prince Leo; Ru and Captain Freya. Image courtesy of "Promised Land"/Kickstarter and "Maiden Voyage"/Kickstarter." expand=1]Farm boy Jack and Prince Leo; Ru and Captain Freya. Image courtesy of "Promised Land"/Kickstarter and "Maiden Voyage"/Kickstarter.

"Maiden Voyage" is currently seeking to raise $28,000 by its fundraising deadline on Nov. 14, 2017.

Once the book is published, supporters can get paperback and e-versions of the tale, as well as coloring sheets of the characters and other neat rewards.

"We invite you to step aboard and join us on this journey to bring a little more kindness and love into the world," the Kickstarter page reads. "Because love is love, and everyone deserves to live happily ever after."

That first car is a rite of passage into adulthood. Specifically, the hard-earned lesson of expectations versus reality. Though some of us are blessed with Teslas at 17, most teenagers receive a car that’s been … let’s say previously loved. And that’s probably a good thing, considering nearly half of first-year drivers end up in wrecks. Might as well get the dings on the lemon, right?

Of course, wrecks aside, buying a used car might end up costing more in the long run after needing repairs, breaking down and just a general slew of unexpected surprises. But hey, at least we can all look back and laugh.

My first car, for example, was a hand-me-down Toyota of some sort from my mother. I don’t recall the specific model, but I definitely remember getting into a fender bender within the first week of having it. She had forgotten to get the brakes fixed … isn’t that a fun story?

Jimmy Fallon recently asked his “Tonight Show” audience on Twitter to share their own worst car experiences. Some of them make my brake fiasco look like cakewalk (or cakedrive, in this case). Either way, these responses might make us all feel a little less alone. Or at the very least, give us a chuckle.

Here are 22 responses with the most horsepower:

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TikTok about '80s childhood is a total Gen X flashback.

As a Gen X parent, it's weird to try to describe my childhood to my kids. We're the generation that didn't grow up with the internet or cell phones, yet are raising kids who have never known a world without them. That difference alone is enough to make our 1980s childhoods feel like a completely different planet, but there are other differences too that often get overlooked.

How do you explain the transition from the brown and orange aesthetic of the '70s to the dusty rose and forest green carpeting of the '80s if you didn't experience it? When I tell my kids there were smoking sections in restaurants and airplanes and ashtrays everywhere, they look horrified (and rightfully so—what were we thinking?!). The fact that we went places with our friends with no quick way to get ahold of our parents? Unbelievable.

One day I described the process of listening to the radio, waiting for my favorite song to come on so I could record it on my tape recorder, and how mad I would get when the deejay talked through the intro of the song until the lyrics started. My Spotify-spoiled kids didn't even understand half of the words I said.

And '80s hair? With the feathered bangs and the terrible perms and the crunchy hair spray? What, why and how?

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"Veteran" mom and "new" mom parent differently.

When a couple has their first child, they start out with the greatest of intentions and expectations. The child will only eat organic food. They will never watch TV or have screen time and will always stay clean.

But soon, reality sets in and if they have more kids, they'll probably be raised with a lot less attention. As a result, first-born kids turn out a bit differently than their younger siblings.

"Rules are a bit more rigid, attention and validation is directed and somewhat excessive," Niro Feliciano, LCSW, a psychotherapist and anxiety specialist, told Parents. "As a result, firstborns tend to be leaders, high achievers, people-pleasing, rule-following and conscientious, several of the qualities that tend to predict success."

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