Neil deGrasse Tyson's viral video is straight-up scientific fire.

Science is part of how America became America, Neil deGrasse Tyson says in a video.

In the video, posted in April 2017, Tyson delivers what he says might be his most important message ever: America — stop messing around.

C'mon! We put a man on the moon! We invented the internet! And yeah, we've never been a perfect county. Every era had challenges. Tyson recalls the '60s and '70s: Vietnam, the civil rights movement, the Cold War.


But even then, he says, we never had to argue about what fundamental, scientific facts were.

GIF from StarTalk Radio/YouTube.

We didn't have Vice President Mike Pence disparaging evolution as just a theory. We didn't have false scares about vaccines (and a president who spouts anti-vaxxer rhetoric) or GMOs. We didn't have to argue about whether the planet was getting warmer.

Over the past few decades, we've seemingly lost the ability to agree on what the truth even is, which Tyson warns is a dangerous path.

GIF from StarTalk Radio/YouTube.

Most of all, though, Tyson is done — completely and utterly done — messing around when it comes to people who don't take science seriously.

There are solutions. Take climate change, for instance. We could fight climate change with a carbon tax, or increased regulations, or more nuclear power plants, or solar energy plants. Heck, we could do all of the above! But nooooo, instead we have a Congress that literally throws snowballs around.

You can just hear in his voice how sick and tired he is of it.

“Every minute one is in denial, you are delaying the political solution that should have been established years ago," says Tyson.

Tyson is channeling the passion and frustration that so many of us are feeling right now. It's awesome to see that brought out in force.

Watch Neil deGrasse Tyson's full, impassioned video:

Science In America

Dear Facebook UniverseI offer this four-minute video on "Science in America" containing what may be the most important words I have ever spoken.As always, but especially these days, keep looking up.—Neil deGrasse Tyson

Posted by Neil deGrasse Tyson on Wednesday, 19 April 2017
Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

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