Michelle Branch posted a breastfeeding photo from her wedding day, because brides multitask.
Photo by Michael Buckner/Getty Images for Samsung

Remember when Facebook wouldn’t allow users to post breastfeeding photos because they violated the site’s nudity policy?

Just five years ago, posting a breastfeeding photo was an act of defiance. Because of those acts of defiance, breastfeeding photos are no longer a big deal.

In fact, it can be quite beautiful. Now, Facebook welcomes mothers to share their experiences – experiences which can include feeding your baby on your wedding day.


Michelle Branch got married to the Black Key’s Patrick Carney in New Orleans, and now the singer-songwriter’s wedding album is going to include an ode to motherhood. Branch posted a photo of herself breastfeeding her son, Rhys, while clad in her wedding dress and veil.

Branch captioned the Instagram post with “a baby has to eat when a baby has to eat,”making the point that you never stop being a mom, even on your wedding day.

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Branch’s photo is another punch in the fight to destigmatize breastfeeding. By posting the photo, Branch shows that nursing mother have to do it whenever, wherever. Not only is breastfeeding natural, but you can look elegant while doing it.

The photo garnered a lot of support onInstagram, receiving an overwhelming amount of positive comments.

“And THIS is why women are amazing!! You’re a queen!” one person wrote on Instagram. “Such a beautiful bride.in a tender moment,” wrote another. One user put it simply: “#normalizebreastfeeding.”

Branch was also an inspiration to other moms just by posting a photo of breastfeeding in such a casual, normal way.

“Loveeeee,” wrote one commenter. “@alifedotowsky just posted a memory of her feeding her daughter in her wedding day and I just think it's beautiful. I have been struggling to feed my ten week old soon (tongue/lip ties, thrush, clogged ducts, etc) and these images help me wanna keep going!”

Other women were motivated to share their breastfeeding stories, including those who had to wear the mom and bride hat on the same day.  

“This is the best- I remember nursing my oldest daughter on my wedding day in my dress and being so worried about her spitting up on it 😆congratulations!” wrote one person. “Giiirlll, I’ve had my teets out everywhere breastfeeding,” wrote another user.

Branch’s photo helps demonstrate that it’s important for mothers to post about their experiences. By posting a photo in such a casual way, it destigmatizes the act by refusing to accept there’s a stigma in the first place. Additionally, it tells other mothers that there’s nothing wrong in nursing your child. And what can be more beautiful than that?

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.