Mayor Pete showed his language skills by offering his heartfelt condolences about Notre Dame in French.
via Scott Olson / Getty Images

A newly-elected president is often the polar opposite of their predecessor. Jimmy Carter’s aw-shucks “I’ll never lie to you” approach stood in stark contrast to the scandal-ridden Nixon era.

Then, Ronald Reagan’s sunny optimism was ab about face from the dreary Carter era.

Barack Obama’s message of hope was much needed in the aftermath of America’s economic collapse and war-weariness that occurred under George W. Bush.


Then came Trump, who turned on Obama’s message of hope in favor of retrogressive populism.

Should America decide to elect someone new in 2020, Democrat “Mayor Pete” Buttigieg would fit the historical trend of going with someone completely different.

Buttigieg is a young, highly-intelligent, thoughtful, veteran who happens to be gay.

The Harvard and Oxford graduate also speaks seven different languages: Norwegian, Spanish, Italian, Maltese, Arabic, Dari, and French. He took up Norweigan just so he could read one of his favorite authors in their native tongue.

Trump doesn’t read.

After a massive fire destroyed parts of the iconic Notre Dame cathedral in France, Buttigieg offered his condolences to the French in their language.

“To the people of France, I would like to say that Notre Dame Cathedral was like a gift to the human race. We share in the pain but we also thank you for this gift to civilization,” he told French media outlet BFM TV.

The French’s biggest criticism of Americans is our inability to speak their language. So Buttigieg’s response was undoubtedly more meaningful than the response by the president of the U.S., who offered amateur firefighter advice.

Buttigieg’s message was praised by the French ambassador to the U.S.

According to a recent Monmouth poll, Buttigieg is currently in third among Democratic presidential candidates in the upcoming Iowa caucuses. Likely-to-run Joe Biden is first with 27%, Bernie Sanders is second at 16%, while Buttigieg is next at 9%.

Courtesy of Verizon
True

If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

via CNN / Twitter

Eviction seemed imminent for Dasha Kelly, 32, and her three young daughters Sharron, 8; Kia, 6; and Imani, 5, on Monday. The eviction moratorium expired over the weekend and it looked like there was no way for them to avoid becoming homeless.

The former Las Vegas card dealer lost her job due to casino closures during the pandemic and needed $2,000 to cover her back rent. The mother of three couldn't bear the thought of being put out of her apartment with three children in the scorching Nevada desert.

"I had no idea what we were going to do," Kelly said, according to KOAT.

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