Blink-182's Mark Hoppus is now cancer free, and fans are rejoicing at the news

Blink-182

After six months of chemotherapy, iconic Blink-182's vocalist and bassist Mark Hoppus announced on Twitter that he is cancer free. His Twitter bio now reads: "bassist singer person in the blink-182 and simple creatures. he/him. Cancer Destroyer."


Since sharing his diagnosis in June, Hoppus has been the epitome of good spirits while being open about his struggle. In his first online message to the public, he stated "It sucks and I'm scared, and at the same time I'm blessed with incredible doctors and family and friends to get me through this. … I'm trying to remain hopeful and positive. Can't wait to be cancer free and see you all at a concert in the near future. Love to you all."

This initial announcement, though tragic, incited an outpouring of heartfelt support from fellow music legends and loyal fans. Clearly, this musician—who helped create that distinctly bombastic, aggressively playful sound loved by headbangers everywhere—had made a positive impact.

As Hoppus underwent chemotherapy, he candidly documented his treatment updates. Usually with an added joke, like this Instagram photo, where he wrote, "Yes hello. One cancer treatment, please."

Hoppus' Instagram Story, shared by today.com media-cldnry.s-nbcnews.com

Clearly, some days were more lighthearted than others. Recently, Hoppus shared how dismally uncomfortable the process was, plainly describing his new normal as "getting pumped full of poison every three weeks."

But for the most part, it appears he's been in fairly high spirits. He even posted a picture to his Instagram of his previously bald scalp (which had begun to grow white hairs) with the added caption:

"I mean what the shit is this? Is my hair growing back white? If it does I wonder if I'll look more like George Clooney or Doc Brown? I feel like this is still the cancery peach fuzz hair and maybe my normal hair will start growing again? It's so strange to have hair growing back more on my head while my leg hair continues to fall out further and further down, now at the bottom of my shins. I've been in chemotherapy for five months and TODAY the hair on my shins decides it's time to peace out? Cancer is weird."

It's the sort of comedy I would lovingly expect from a guy made famous by singing about running around naked and dancing like an animal.

The optimism clearly paid off, as yesterday he was able to give his cancer free announcement on Twitter and Instagram. Hoppus' words were full of gratitude and warmth as he wrote, "Thank you God and the universe and friends and family and everyone who sent support and kindness and love. Still have to get scanned every six months and it'll take me until the end of the year to get back to normal but today is an amazing day and I feel so blessed."

Of course, this was fantastic news for more than just Hoppus. In addition to responses from John Mayer, Adam DeVine and Benjamin Madden, even Blink-182's drummer Travis Barker joined in congratulating his band brother, according to Us Weekly. And let's not forget the touching fan comments:






Congratulations, Mark. Kicking cancer's ass is cool. But kicking cancer's ass and maintaining a sense of humor? Now that's punk rock.

True

When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."