Kids were asked about Trump's first year in office. Hilarious, brutal honesty ensued.

Jimmy Kimmel wanted to know what kids thought about President Donald Trump's first year in office. So he asked.

"Trump's approval ratings, according to the polls that were released today, is at 37%, which isn't great," the host of "Jimmy Kimmel Live" explained in a segment that aired Jan. 18, 2018. "But that was a poll of adults. I wanted to see what kids thought of his first year in office."

The show sent a correspondent out on the streets to get kids' thoughts on the matter. And hilarity ensued:



Some of the kids' answers were just flat-out hilarious.

"What's the first thing you think of when I say Donald Trump?" the correspondent asked a boy. "Small fingers," he answered.

"Donald Trump has a lot of nicknames for people like 'Crooked Hillary' or 'Rocket Man.' Do you have a nickname for him?" another girl was asked. She quipped:




GIF via Jimmy Kimmel Live/YouTube.

But other responses hinted at deeper truths — even if they were still worth a chuckle.

"He wants to put a wall over Mexico," one kid noted when asked if Trump has done a good job in his first year. "And I, like, love going to Mexico."

"I think he needs to stop threatening North Korea," another kid said. "I don't want to get nuked."

The segment was clearly intended to be a lighthearted jab at Trump. But it's worth noting how profoundly Trump has affected our kids.

"It's hard to be a parent tonight for a lot of us," CNN's Van Jones said the night of the 2016 election. "You tell your kids don't be a bully. You tell your kids don't be a bigot. You tell your kids do your homework and be prepared. And then you have this outcome."

Some parents have found ways to navigate these difficult conversations and help their young ones if they're feeling confused or anxious; like encouraging them to draw out their feelings, for example, or explain to them how our electoral college system works, so kids can feel empowered with information.

Still, it's tough.  

"You have people putting children to bed tonight, and they're afraid of breakfast," Jones said on election night. "They're afraid of, 'How do I explain this to my children?'"

A report by BuzzFeed News published last summer found students across the country were using Trump's taunts to bully their classmates, often resorting to racially charged rhetoric targeting non-white kids.

Plus, a survey released in October 2017 by UCLA noted that school teachers reported they'd noticed more students experiencing anxiety over the current political climate in this new "age of Trump," according to NPR.

Our kids are listening.

"Do you think he's smart?" the "Jimmy Kimmel Live" correspondent asked one girl. "No," she responded. "He treats people badly, and that's why I don't think he's smart."

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.