More

Jon Stewart Takes On The Terrorist Attack Against Charlie Hebdo

"Our goal tonight is not to make sense of this, because there is no sense to made of this."

The horrific murder of 12 people by terrorists at the satirical newspaper Charles Hebdo shocked the world. Jon Stewart started his show on a serious note to address it.

"I know very few people go into comedy as an act of courage, mainly because it shouldn't have to be that. It shouldn't be an act of courage, it should be taken as established law. But those guys at Hebdo had it, and they were killed for their cartoons."

Watch him say what needs to be said.


It says a lot that these cartoons were so threatening to the ideas of a small extremist segment of society that they felt the need to take lives. Cartoonist Ted Rall, who occasionally got death threats after 9/11 from Americans (including from an actual police officer), put together his thoughts in the aftermath and also said what needed to be said.

Think of the rage behind the gunmen who invaded Charlie Hebdo's office yesterday, and that of the men who ordered them to do so. It's too early to say for sure, but it's a fair guess that they were radical Islamists. I'd like to ask them: how weak is your faith, how lame a Muslim must you be, to allow yourself to be reduced to the murder of innocents, over ink on paper colorized in Photoshop?

I highly recommend reading his whole article. Think about that. This was simply ink on paper. That was the dangerous power of a cartoon.

And, ironically, the violent acts of these monsters only stood to make the speech they hate more powerful. They've turned a paper with a weekly readership of 60,000 into an international phenomenon. And they've reinforced the very narrative they seek to end.

According to the BBC:

French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo will go to print next week, in defiance of Wednesday's apparent militant Islamist attack.
Ten journalists and two police were killed when masked attackers opened fire at its Paris headquarters.
Columnist Patrick Pelloux said the decision to continue to publish will show that "stupidity will not win".
It will have a print run of one million copies, compared with its usual 60,000 a week.
It will be half its usual length at eight pages long.
"It's very hard. We are all suffering, with grief, with fear, but we will do it anyway because stupidity will not win," Pelloux told the AFP news agency.




Or as my old college professor and favorite cartoonist James MacLeod drew it:

My thoughts are with the folks at Charlie Hebdo. Let's make sure this tragedy isn't ever thought of as a victory for intimidation and violence. Ideas trump mindless violence, even in death.

#JeSuisCharlie. (I am Charlie.)

via Jody Danielle Fisher / Facebook

Breast milk is an incredibly magical food. The wonderful thing is that it's produced by a collaboration between mother and baby.

British mother Jody Danielle Fisher shared the miracle of this collaboration on Facebook recently after having her 13-month-old child vaccinated.

In the post, she compared the color of her breast milk before and after the vaccination, to show how a baby's reaction to the vaccine has a direct effect on her mother's milk production.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Picsea on Unsplash
True

It is said that once you've seen something, you can't unsee it. This is exactly what is happening in America right now. We have collectively watched the pot of racial tension boil over after years of looking the other way, insisting that hot water doesn't exist, pretending not to notice the smoke billowing out from every direction.

Ignoring a problem doesn't make it go away—it prolongs resolution. There's a whole lot of harm to be remedied and damage to be repaired as a result of racial injustice, and it's up to all of us to figure out how to do that. Parents, in particular, are recognizing the importance of raising anti-racist children; if we are unable to completely eradicate racism, maybe the next generation will.

How can parents ensure that the next generation will actively refuse to perpetuate systems and behaviors embedded in racism? The most obvious answer is to model it. Take for example, professional tennis player Serena Williams and her husband, Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Mahir Uysal on Unsplash

Two years ago, I got off the phone after an interview and cried my eyes out. I'd just spent an hour talking to Tim Ballard, the founder of Operation Underground Railroad, an organization that helps fight child sex trafficking, and I just couldn't take it.

Ballard told me about how the training to go undercover as a child predator nearly broke him. He told me an eerie story of a trafficker who could totally compartmentalize, showing Ballard photos of kids he had for sale, then switching gears to proudly show him a photo of his own daughter on her bicycle, just as any parent would. He told me about how lucrative child trafficking is—how a child can bring in three or four times as much as a female prostitute—and how Americans are the industry's biggest consumers.

Keep Reading Show less

Believe it or not, there has been a lot of controversy lately about how people cook rice. According to CNN, the "outrage" was a reaction to a clip Malaysian comedian Nigel Ng posted as one of his personas known as Uncle Roger.

It was a hilarious (and harmless) satire about the method chef Hersha Patel used to cook rice on the show BBC Food.


Keep Reading Show less