International pop star and fashion icon Rihanna unveiled her long-awaited beauty line Thursday night to much fanfare.

With fabulous launch events in London and New York, the singer's latest project, Fenty Beauty, made its star-studded debut Sept. 7. The high-end makeup line features primers, lipsticks, brushes, and both everyday and special occasion looks.

Fenty Beauty by Rihanna launches at Harvey Nichols in London. Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images for Fenty and Harvey Nichols.


But among the bright lights, glamour, and convivial atmosphere was a crucial aspect of the products' long-awaited debut: inclusion.

RiRi's line features a wide range of colors and undertones, from soft pale beiges to warm browns. There are products available for people of every complexion — a rare find in a cosmetic industry that often ignores the outliers, particularly those with dark skin.

Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images for Fenty and Harvey Nichols.

This commitment to inclusivity begins all the way at the top, as Rihanna explained why this type of representation is so important.

In the short clip below, Rihanna shared that she wanted every product to feel accessible to people with different complexions, going so far as to call out subtle touches like blue or pink undertones.

"I was like, 'Let me see something for a dark-skinned girl. Let me see something for a pale girl. Let me see someone in between.' There's so many different shades. There's red undertones, there's green undertones, there's blue undertones, there's pink undertones, there's yellow. You just never know, so you want people to appreciate the product and not feel like 'Oh that's cute but it only looks good on her.'"

BOOM!

While Rihanna makes nearly everything look effortless, recognizing the importance of diversity and inclusion is truly something all of us can do.

Seeing ourselves in stories, advertisements, and even the makeup counter is vital to feeling welcome and supported.

You don't need a world tour or a burgeoning beauty empire to encourage diverse voices in your community, workplace, and the companies and brands you support. Start with listening to the people and ideas that often go unheard, and if you come from a position of privilege, be sure to pass the mic.

We can all do better. And just like she always has, Rihanna will show us the way.

Photo by Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images.

Note: We were not paid by Fenty Beauty to promote this. (We would tell you!) We just think it's just awesome to see some diverse representation.

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Man uses TikTok to offer 'dinner with dad' to any kid that needs one, even adult ones

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud.

Come for the food, stay for the wholesomeness.

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud. His TikTok channel is dedicated to giving people intimate conversations they might long to have with their own father, but can’t. The most popular is his “Dinner With Dad” segment.

The concept is simple: Clayton, aka Dad, always sets down two plates of food. He always tells you what’s for dinner. He always blesses the food. He always checks in with how you’re doing.

I stress the stability here, because as someone who grew up with a less-than-stable relationship with their parents, it stood out immediately. I found myself breathing a sigh of relief at Clayton’s consistency. I also noticed the immediate emotional connection created just by being asked, “How was your day?” According to relationship coach and couples counselor Don Olund, these two elements—stability and connection—are fundamental cravings that children have of their parents. Perhaps we never really stop needing it from them.


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All photos from Pilllsbury used with permission

Pillsbury is partnering with non profit, Operation Homefront, to provide housing for veterans

True

It’s the dream of many veterans: a safe and swift return to the security of home – to a place where time can be spent with family while becoming part of a community and creating new memories. With the partnership of non-profit Operation Homefront, Pillsbury is helping give military families the opportunity to do just that.

For many of our American soldiers, the dream of making a comfortable return to civilian life is often dashed by harsh realities. Pew Research Center reports that 44% of veterans who have served since Sept 11, 2001 noted having a difficult time re-adjusting. From re-entering into the workforce to finding healthcare services, returning to civilian life can be a harrowing transition. While serving in the military is incredibly stressful, it also provides routine, structure and purpose that is not easily replicated in civilian life. Couple this with a lack of helpful resources for veterans, and the hope for a brighter future can be easily derailed.


However, some companies and organizations are stepping in to show support and provide resources. Operation Homefront, an organization dedicated to helping military families transition back to civilian life, launched its Transitional Homes for Veterans (THV) Program in 2018. The program places veteran families in safe, secure, rent-free single-family homes for a period of two-to-three years while providing financial coaching and training to reduce debt, increase savings, and prepare for independent home ownership. Since the THV’s inception, Operation Homefront has defrayed more than $500K in mortgage costs to military families.

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TikTok about '80s childhood is a total Gen X flashback.

As a Gen X parent, it's weird to try to describe my childhood to my kids. We're the generation that didn't grow up with the internet or cell phones, yet are raising kids who have never known a world without them. That difference alone is enough to make our 1980s childhoods feel like a completely different planet, but there are other differences too that often get overlooked.

How do you explain the transition from the brown and orange aesthetic of the '70s to the dusty rose and forest green carpeting of the '80s if you didn't experience it? When I tell my kids there were smoking sections in restaurants and airplanes and ashtrays everywhere, they look horrified (and rightfully so—what were we thinking?!). The fact that we went places with our friends with no quick way to get ahold of our parents? Unbelievable.

One day I described the process of listening to the radio, waiting for my favorite song to come on so I could record it on my tape recorder, and how mad I would get when the deejay talked through the intro of the song until the lyrics started. My Spotify-spoiled kids didn't even understand half of the words I said.

And '80s hair? With the feathered bangs and the terrible perms and the crunchy hair spray? What, why and how?

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