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It's Legal In 23 States Now. Watch Modern-Day Prohibition States Fall Like Dominoes.

2014 saw three more states adding marijuana legalization of some kind. We're getting there, folks.

57% of Americans live in states that allow marijuana use of some kind.

In all, 23 states now have some form of marijuana legalization on the books. It's a bit like marriage equality in that the wheels of justice are spinning faster and faster as we head toward marijuana being considered less dangerous than a fifth of whiskey. No, really. And I'm including 2013 here just because I can and because one of those states is in the Heartland, which is usually the last place to adopt social change-y type stuff.


2013:

  • Illinois: 2.5 ounces within a 15-day period (But really … how would they know?)
  • New Hampshire: 2 ounces during a 10-day period

2014:

  • Maryland: 30-day supply, amount to be determined
  • Minnesota: 30-day supply on non-smokable marijuana (so, oils and edibles)
  • New York: 30-day supply, non-smokable
  • Alaska was already a medical marijuana state, and 2014 it passed a bill legalizing it fully, as did Oregon, after Colorado and Washington did the same in 2012. Once states across the country watch the tax revenue come in there, they'll get in line — guaranteed.
  • Florida would have joined the medical marijuana states but required 60% approval and couldn't quite get there. 58% were in favor, but that meant it failed. Because Florida.

Here's a very satisfying map of legalization of some kind — medical, full, etc. — since 1996. That's when California started this wonderful, beautiful domino effect.


And just for fun and your listening pleasure, here's Bob Marley's "Stir It Up." You're welcome.

I live in Washington, the state with the first official outbreak of COVID-19 in the U.S. While my family lives several hours from Seattle, it was alarming to be near the epicenter—especially early in the pandemic when we knew even less about the coronavirus than we know now.

As tracking websites went up and statistics started pouring in, things looked hairy for Washington. But not for long. We could have and should have shut everything down faster than we did, but Governor Inslee took the necessary steps to keep the virus from flying completely out of control. He's consistently gotten heat from all sides, but in general he listened to the infectious disease experts and followed the lead of public health officials—which is exactly what government needs to do in a pandemic.

As a result, we've spent the past several months watching Washington state drop from the #1 hotspot down to 23rd in the nation (as of today) for total coronavirus cases. In cases per million population, we're faring even better at number 38. We have a few counties where outbreaks are pretty bad, and cases have slowly started to rise as the state has reopened—which was to be expected—but I've felt quite satisfied with how it's been handled at the state level. The combination of strong state leadership and county-by-county reopenings has born statistically impressive results—especially considering the fact that we didn't have the lead time that other states did to prepare for the outbreak.

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