In rural Kenya, women's healthcare can be hard to access. This program is changing that.
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Pfizer

Susan, a 25-year-old who lives in rural West Pokot, Kenya, has a daily routine.

All photos via Pfizer.

She wakes up at 6am every day to get water from the river. She prepares breakfast for her family. She gets her five children ready for school. Then she sets off for work, caring for her animals and plowing the earth on her farm.


On her one day off a week, she takes her family to church. She loves spending time with her family and community.

Susan, and women like her, have always played an important role in the local culture. However, they’ve often had challenges accessing information and resources about their health, including the importance of healthy timing and spacing of pregnancies, as well as the health of their children. But that's changing.

"Now my community sees that a mother's health is important, too," Susan says.

Unfortunately, in rural communities like Susan’s, getting quality healthcare can be difficult – the distance to clinics can be long, which can be a challenge for local women who have so many other responsibilities.

The Pfizer Foundation* with partners like World Vision, however, are helping to empower women like Susan by providing them with information and resources that are allowing them take control of their family's health. Through its Healthy Families, Healthy Futures grants, the Pfizer Foundation and partners are providing family planning information and resources to women at the same time that they take their children to receive routine immunizations. This integrated care is helping remove some of the barriers that impact women and their families in remote and underserved areas.

Thanks to the clinic’s services and community outreach, Susan and her family’s health is reaching new heights. The support she’s receiving is helping her make choices that will strengthen her family and her children's future.

"Gilbert is only four months, but my daughter is nine years old," says Susan. "I want to have time to educate her so she will live a good life with more opportunities. In my community, women only work in the field and look after children and animals. But now we have more choices about our future, health and families. I now have a great vision for my daughter to get the best education and be an important person one day!"

The choices Susan is making today will influence how her children experience their tomorrows. No doubt she'll pass what she's learned on to them, and hopefully they'll do the same with their own. In turn, this information will affect how the community grows for generations to come.

To learn more about Susan and The Pfizer Foundation, check out the 360-degree video below.

*The Pfizer Foundation is a charitable organization established by Pfizer Inc. It is a separate legal entity from Pfizer Inc. with distinct legal restrictions.

Photo courtesy of Justin Sather
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While most 10-year-olds are playing Minecraft, riding bikes, or watching YouTube videos, Justin Sather is intent on saving the planet. And it all started with a frog blanket when he was a baby.

"He carried it everywhere," Justin's mom tells us. "He had frog everything, even a frog-themed birthday party."

In kindergarten, Justin learned that frogs are an indicator species – animals, plants, or microorganisms used to monitor drastic changes in our environment. With nearly one-third of frog species on the verge of extinction due to pollution, pesticides, contaminated water, and habitat destruction, Justin realized that his little amphibian friends had something important to say.

"The frogs are telling us the planet needs our help," says Justin.

While it was his love of frogs that led him to understand how important the species are to our ecosystem, it wasn't until he read the children's book What Do You Do With An Idea by Kobi Yamada that Justin-the-activist was born.

Inspired by the book and with his mother's help, he set out on a mission to raise funds for frog habitats by selling toy frogs in his Los Angeles neighborhood. But it was his frog art which incorporated scientific facts that caught people's attention. Justin's message spread from neighbor to neighbor and through social media; so much so that he was able to raise $2,000 for the non-profit Save The Frogs.

And while many kids might have their 8th birthday party at a laser tag center or a waterslide park, Justin invited his friends to the Ballona wetlands ecological preserve to pick invasive weeds and discuss the harms of plastic pollution.

Justin's determination to save the frogs and help the planet got a massive boost when he met legendary conservationist Dr. Jane Goodall.

Photo courtesy of Justin Sather

At one of her Roots and Shoots youth initiative events, Dr. Goodall was so impressed with Justin's enthusiasm for helping frogs, she challenged the young activist to take it one step further and focus on plastic pollution as well. Justin accepted her challenge and soon after was featured in an issue of Bravery Magazine dedicated to Jane Goodall.

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