Imagine if every school played this Kid President 'pep talk' before class.
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Target First Day Of School

Wisdom comes with age, huh? Don't try telling that to Kid President.

The kid's on fire in this insightful and funny pep talk that we can all most definitely take something from.

Kid President doesn't claim to know it all, but he does know a few things.

And I tell you what, if you wake up in the morning with at least one of these five things on your mind, I bet you'll conquer your day. Kid President tested. Kid President approved.


1. You matter. Don't let anyone make you think differently.

We are all unique and weird and amazing in our own ways. Sure you'll have your ups and downs, but keep that head up. YOU matter.

It's science, man! And also, you are great.

2. Being a bully is dumb. Don't do it.

Be nice instead. It'll take you further in life, and someday you'll look back on the bullies that you've known and think, "They wasted so much time being horrible to others. No wonder they're still living in their mom's basement!"

Ain't nobody got time for bullies.

3. History is made by ordinary people — like you and me and Justin Timberlake!

If you have an idea that you love, go for it. You never know what'll happen. Maybe you'll invent something or write the next hit song. It's up to you!

Ordinary people who aren't afraid to try (and fail sometimes, too!).

4. If you want to change the world, you'll need to know about it first.

Life is one big school. Rule #1? You gotta show up! Listen, read, ask questions, and most importantly: Be present!

Eek. Can you imagine?

5. Is there a teacher or person in your life who inspires you? Let them know.

Don't let those who've helped you in life go about their days not knowing it. Tell them how much they mean to you. Text them. Call them. Tell them in person. Heck, even write on their Facebook wall! It'll make their day. Promise.

You heard the kid!

It's true: No matter who you are, somebody is learning from you. Everybody is a teacher, and everybody is a student.

So what do you want to teach the world? What do you want to learn? Find out and go do it!

And maybe share this to inspire those around you to do the same. Because honestly, we are so much better when we're being our very best together.

Let's do it.

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Shanda Lynn Poitra was born and raised on the Turtle Mountain Reservation in Belcourt, North Dakota. She lived there until she was 24 years old when she left for college at the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks.

"Unfortunately," she says, "I took my bad relationship with me. At the time, I didn't realize it was so bad, much less, abusive. Seeing and hearing about abusive relationships while growing up gave me the mentality that it was just a normal way of life."

Those college years away from home were difficult for a lot of reasons. She had three small children — two in diapers, one in elementary school — as well as a full-time University class schedule and a part-time job as a housekeeper.

"I wore many masks back then and clothing that would cover the bruises," she remembers. "Despite the darkness that I was living in, I was a great student; I knew that no matter what, I HAD to succeed. I knew there was more to my future than what I was living, so I kept working hard."

While searching for an elective class during this time, she came across a one-credit, 20-hour IMPACT self-defense class that could be done over a weekend. That single credit changed her life forever. It helped give her the confidence to leave her abusive relationship and inspired her to bring IMPACT classes to other Native women in her community.

I walked into class on a Friday thinking that I would simply learn how to handle a person trying to rob me, and I walked out on a Sunday evening with a voice so powerful that I could handle the most passive attacks to my being, along with physical attacks."

It didn't take long for her to notice the difference the class was making in her life.

"I was setting boundaries and people were either respecting them or not, but I was able to acknowledge who was worth keeping in my life and who wasn't," she says.

Following the class, she also joined a roller derby league where she met many other powerful women who inspired her — and during that summer, she found the courage to leave her abuser.

"As afraid as I was, I finally had the courage to report the abuse to legal authorities, and I had the support of friends and family who provided comfort for my children and I during this time," she says.

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via Matt Radick / Flickr

Joe Biden reversed Donald Trump's ban on transgender people serving in the military earlier this year, allowing the entire LGBTQ community to serve for the first time.

Anti-gay sentiment in the U.S. military goes as far back as 1778 when Lieutenant Frederick Gotthold Enslin was convicted at court-martial on charges of sodomy and perjury. The military would go on to make sodomy a crime in 1920 and worthy of dishonorable discharge.

In 1949 the Department of Defense standardized its anti-LGBT regulations across the military, declaring: "Homosexual personnel, irrespective of sex, should not be permitted to serve in any branch of the Armed Forces in any capacity, and prompt separation of known homosexuals from the Armed Forces is mandatory."

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