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If You're Wondering How To Talk About Black People And White People, Here Are 5 Things To Keep In Mind

In this great big world, each and every one of us has privilege. I may be a gay black person, but I'm still a man. I hold advantages that women don't. So when I help a woman out through one of my more feminist posts, I have to keep certain things in mind to remain a good ally, a person who wants to fight for the equality of a marginalized group they're not a part of.Let's make sure that when we help friends who are LGBT, people of color, women, or whoever else wants to smite the patriarchy, we're actually helping.

If You're Wondering How To Talk About Black People And White People, Here Are 5 Things To Keep In Mind

In case you can't watch the video, here's Upworthy badass woman Franchesca Ramsey with five tips for all of us so we can be good allies.

(An ally is a person who wants to fight for the equality of a marginalized group they're not a part of.)


1. Understand your privilege.

There are some things in life you will not experience or ever have to think about just because of who you are.

It's kind of like those horses that have those blinders on. They can see just fine. There's just a whole bunch of stuff on the side that they don't even know exists.

For example, there are currently 34 states where you can legally be fired for being gay or trans.

I know.

"As a straight cis woman, those are things that I don't have to ever think about if I don't want to. I'm not going to be fired because I'm straight, and I'm not going to be fired because I'm cis. Before I can fight for the right of others, I have to understand what rights I have and others don't."

2. Listen and do your homework.

It sounds like a no-brainer, but it's not possible for you to learn if you aren't willing to listen.

What she said.

Get caught up on the issues that are important to the communities you want to support.

3. Speak up but not over.

If the fight for equality was a girl group, the ally wouldn't be the lead singer or the second lead singer. They'd be Michelle.

An ally's job is to support. You want to make sure that you use your privilege and your voice to educate others. But make sure to do it in such a way that does not speak over the community members that you're trying to support or take credit for things that they are already saying.

This isn't Mario Kart. Stay in your lane.

4. Realize that you're going to make mistakes and apologize when you do.

Nobody is perfect. Unlearning problematic things takes time and work. So you are bound to mess up and trip and fall.

But don't worry. You can brush yourself off and get right back up.

Just remember that it's not about your intent. It's about your impact. So when you get called out, make sure to listen, apologize, commit to changing your behavior, and move forward.

5. The most important thing on this list is remember that ally is a verb.

Saying you're an ally is not enough. You've got to do the work.

One through four, one through four.

You'll be the best ally around in no time.

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Davina Agudelo was born in Miami, Florida, but she grew up in Medellín, Colombia.

"I am so grateful for my upbringing in Colombia, surrounded by mountains and mango trees, and for my Colombian family," Agudelo says. "Colombia is the place where I learned what's truly essential in life." It's also where she found her passion for the arts.

While she was growing up, Colombia was going through a violent drug war, and Agudelo turned to literature, theater, singing, and creative writing as a refuge. "Journaling became a sacred practice, where I could leave on the page my dreams & longings as well as my joy and sadness," she says. "During those years, poetry came to me naturally. My grandfather was a poet and though I never met him, maybe there is a little bit of his love for poetry within me."

In 1998, when she left her home and everyone she loved and moved to California, the arts continued to be her solace and comfort. She got her bachelor's degree in theater arts before getting certified in journalism at UCLA. It was there she realized the need to create a media platform that highlighted the positive contributions of LatinX in the US.

"I know the power that storytelling and writing our own stories have and how creative writing can aid us in our own transformation."

In 2012, she started Alegría Magazine and it was a great success. Later, she refurbished a van into a mobile bookstore to celebrate Latin American and LatinX indie authors and poets, while also encouraging children's reading and writing in low-income communities across Southern California.

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via Number 10 / Flickr

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) approved a measure last month that could pave the way for the Catholic Church to deny President Joe Biden communion. The conservative bishops hope to prevent Biden from participating in the sacred ritual because of his support for abortion rights.

Biden is a devout Catholic who considered becoming a priest in his youth. He rarely misses mass, holds a rosary while making critical decisions, and often quotes scriptures. When asked about the bishops' decision Biden said it is "a private matter and I don't think that's going to happen."

The bishops hope the new guidance would push "Catholics who are cultural, political, or parochial leaders to witness the faith."

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