If you love books, you'll need to see this mom's amazing DIY art project.

Picture this:

You're a kid and you just moved into a new house. Your mom is frantically trying to make the new house safe, and it's right around the time when you're learning how to read, too.

But here's the thing: You don't have just any mom. You have a crafty mom. A smart mom. A creative mom. Your mom is Pippa Branham.


She manages to create a safe, durable, nonslip staircase for you that doubles as classical bookshelf, effectively winning parent of the year.

All images via Imgur.

OK, that isn't a real award. But if it were, Branham would definitely be in the running for creating such a safe masterpiece for her daughter.

Branham and her husband, both residents of Liverpool, England, moved to their first home last year. With kids in the mix, they knew they had to create a childproof home. Her initial plan was solid — a simple carpeting project to keep her children from falling down the stairs — but a quick DIY search on Pinterest got the wheels turning in Branham's head.

Using a list of her favorite books, like Lewis Carroll's "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland," Stephen King's "Wolves of the Calla," and Ernest Hemingway's "The Old Man and the Sea," Brenham found original copies and painted the covers on her staircase.

The price tag for creating this beautiful literary staircase was also 180 pounds — about $238 — less than her original idea.

While we’re all dreaming of Abigail’s amazing, literature-filled home, we can also take a page or two from Branham's own book of life.

Reading is easily one of the best ways to learn about the world as a kid. Introducing children to some of our world’s best classics through a staircase is a pretty adorable and creative way to get your child into one of life’s most joyous activities.

New homeowners with and without kids, take note: You can add the joy of reading literally anywhere.

via Pixabay

As people get older, social isolation and loneliness become serious problems. Many find themselves living alone for the first time after the death of a spouse. It's also difficult for older people to maintain friendships when people they've known for years become ill or pass away.

Census Bureau figures say that almost a quarter of men and nearly 46% of women over the age of 75 live alone.

But loneliness doesn't just affect those who reside by themselves. People can feel lonely when there is a discrepancy between their desired and actual relationships. To put it simply, when it comes to having a healthy social life, quality is just as important as quantity.

Keep Reading Show less