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How looking like yourself can help you feel better, shown by 11 before-and-after pics.

This program wants to give women with cancer beauty tips as they bravely fight the disease.

Louanne Roark's grandmother was the kind of woman who always took pride in her appearance. But then she got colon cancer.

Roark says her grandmother would still ask her to paint her fingernails when she was too sick to do it herself, and even though ultimately she passed away, that time spent helping her grandmother look better and feel better — even toward the end — was life-changing.

Today, Roark is carrying that experience forward. She's the executive director of the program Look Good Feel Better. She said, "Our goal is to provide every person with cancer the opportunity to access Look Good Feel Better’s services to help restore their confidence, hope and, most importantly, their sense of self."


In these before-and-after photos, you can see how these simple makeovers make a huge difference for cancer patients.

Here are some amazing photos of women before and after their makeovers.

1. Katherine

Image by Look Good Feel Better, used with permission.

Image by Look Good Feel Better, used with permission.

2. Janice

Image by Look Good Fee Better, used with permission.

Image by Look Good Feel Better, used with permission.

3. Brenda

Image by Look Good Feel Better, used with permission.

Image by Look Good Feel Better, used with permission.

4. Jean

Image by Look Good Feel Better, used with permission.

Image by Look Good Feel Better, used with permission.

5. Kat

Image by Look Good Feel Better, used with permission.

Image by Look Good Feel Better, used with permission.

6. Lisa

Image by Look Good Feel Better, used with permission.

Image by Look Good Feel Better, used with permission.

7. Jane

Image by Look Good Feel Better, used with permission.

Image by Look Good Feel Better, used with permission.

8. Mary

Image by Look Good Feel Better, used with permission.

Image by Look Good Feel Better, used with permission.

9. Michelle

Image by Look Good Feel Better, used with permission.

Image by Look Good Feel Better, used with permission.

10. Vimala

Image by Look Good Feel Better, used with permission.

Image by Look Good Feel Better, used with permission.

11. Vanessa

Image by Look Good Feel Better, used with permission.

Image by Look Good Feel Better, used with permission.

The Look Good Feel Better program was started over 25 years ago to provide makeovers for women with cancer.

It gives women the chance to learn everything they need to know, from professionally trained cosmetologists about keeping their wig looking its best or applying makeup that diminishes the physical toll cancer can take.

The program has helped almost 1 million people so far and hosts over 2,000 workshops each year across the country. But they could still use the word of mouth so more people know about Look Good Feel Better.

Image by Look Good Feel Better, used with permission.

Claire Weiner, a social worker in the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center PsychOncology Program, says their looks are definitely one of the things both men and women struggle with after a diagnosis. She explained that our appearance is part of our identity, so not looking the way you're used to can be an extra burden to carry during an already difficult time.

Image by Look Good Feel Better, used with permission.

A lot of the women who participate have similar reactions. What Roark says she hears the most at these events is that they were unsure of what to expect and resistant to the idea of a makeover. They go into the event feeling unsure and shy but end up feeling self-confident, excited, and proud of the way they look.

Image by Look Good Feel Better, used with permission.

You can't argue with the smiles on their faces post-makeover.

Makeovers aren't a cure, and not every cancer patient wants one. But for those who are struggling to feel like themselves as their appearances change due to harsh treatments, organizations like Look Good Feel Better can be a bright spot in a difficult time.