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Heineken's ad got totally political, and it's surprisingly great.

There's some science to back up Heineken's ad campaign.

Heineken's ad got totally political, and it's surprisingly great.

You won't find parties, loud music, or scantily-clothed women in Heineken's 2017 ad campaign.

Instead, the beer company went in a wonderfully different direction.

The company's #OpenYourWorld campaign is the exact opposite of what we've come to expect from decades of beer ads. The premise of the ad is simple: get two people who disagree with each other on a particular issue, place them in a room together, and let them talk it out over a beer.


Image via Heineken/YouTube.

The ad features people who disagree on issues like climate change, feminism, and transgender rights.

There's one important catch: The two people don't know they disagree with each other when they first sit down.

After a few minutes of getting to know each other, the pair is shown short videos that reveal their dissenting opinions on a particular topic.

Drama! GIF via Heineken/YouTube.

They're then given a choice: They can leave, or they can try to hash out their differences over a beer. (It is a beer ad, after all.)

What makes the ad so brilliant is the flurry of emotions that cross each person's face immediately after the big reveal.

"That's not right," one of the participants says in his pre-recorded video, taking a confidently anti-transgender stance. "You're a man, be a man; or you're a female, be a female."

As the tape rolls, the woman he's been speaking with looks to the ground, appearing uncomfortable and anxious. She is transgender. It was a powerful, intimidating, and suspenseful moment.

It looks like he's about to leave, but does he? GIF via Heineken/YouTube.

By the end of the ad, the man concedes that the "black and white" world he was brought up in is actually filled with more shades of gray than he'd been willing to give it credit for. His tone softens, and you can see that he's considering the issue — and his drinking partner — in a whole new light.

Is sitting down over a beer really enough to overcome our differences?

Surprisingly, it turns out that the ad is pretty spot-on.

A number of studies have shown that short, casual, in-person conversations with someone with an opposing viewpoint is one of the easiest paths to changing someone's mind.

Image via Heineken/YouTube.

This may very well be one of the few times where trying to mimic what you've seen in a beer ad is totally appropriate — and encouraged. It's for the sake of humanity, after all.

You can check out the full ad below.

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Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday are teaming up to find the people who lead with love everyday.

Know someone in your neighborhood who's known for their optimistic attitude, commitment to bettering their community and always leading with love? Tell us about them for the chance to win a $2,000 grant to keep doing good in their community.

Nomination ends November 22, 2020

File:Pornhub-logo.svg - Wikimedia Commons

A 2015 survey conducted by the National Union of Students found that 60% of respondents turned to porn to fill in the gaps in sex education. While 40% of those people said they learned a little, 75% of respondents said they felt porn created unrealistic expectations when it comes to sex. Some of the unrealistic expectations from porn can be dangerous. A study found that 88% of porn contained violence, and another study found that those who consumed porn were more likely to become sexually aggressive.

But now the thing that breaks those unrealistic expectations… might also be porn? Pornhub has launched a sex education section.

The adult website's first series is simply titled, "Pornhub Sex Ed" and contains 11 videos and is accessible through the Pornhub Sexual Wellness Center. The section also contains articles, some showing real anatomy and examples in order to bust myths people may have picked up on other portions of the website.

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A lot of people here are like family to me," Michelle says about Bread for the City — a community nonprofit located in Washington DC that provides local residents with food, clothing, health care, social advocacy, and legal services. And since the pandemic began, the need to support organizations like Bread for the City is greater than ever, which is why Amazon is Delivering Smiles to local charities across the country this holiday season.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.

There are creative, romantic proposals, and then there's this one.

Lee Loechler recently proposed to his girlfriend, Sthuthi David, by taking her to a packed theater to see her favorite movie, Sleeping Beauty. Little did she know that Loechler had spent six months altering the animation of the film's most iconic scene, changing the characters to look like the couple themselves and altering the storyline to set up his Big Question. And that's only the beginning.

Watching David's face during the scene change is sheer delight, as her confused look proves that she has no clue what is about to happen. The set-up is great, but the magical moment when Loechler's illustrated self tosses the engagement ring to his real-life self? That's when we all toss up our hands and say, "OKAY, man. You win at proposing. Everyone else must bow before you now."

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While many of us have understandably let the challenges of 2020 get under our skin and bring us down, a young man from Florida was securing his place in the Guinness Book of World Records. Chris Nikic became the first person with Down syndrome to complete a full triathlon.

For the majority of people, a 2.4 mile swim, a 112 mile bike ride or a 26.2 mile run would be difficult on its own. The Ironman competition requires participants to complete them all in one grueling race. In a statement, Special Olympics Florida President and CEO Sherry Wheelock called Chris "an inspiration to all of us." She continued, "We are incredibly proud of Chris and the work he has put in to achieve this monumental goal. He's become a hero to athletes, fans, and people across Florida and around the world."

Nikic's journey to become an Ironman started off as a challenge far less lofty. He and his father, Nik, created the "1 percent better challenge." The idea was to keep Chris motivated during the pandemic and beyond. According to The Washington Post, the idea was for Chris to improve his workouts by one percent each day because he "doesn't like pain" but loves "food, videos games and my couch." The plan was to keep building strength and stamina while keeping his eye on the grand prize of completing a triathlon. Nik told the Panama City News Herald, "I was concerned because after high school and after graduation a lot of kids with Down syndrome become isolated and just start living a life of isolation. I said, 'Look, let's go find him something to get him back into the world and get him involved,' so we started looking around and we were fortunate that at the same time Special Olympics Florida started this triathlon program, and I thought, 'What a great way to get him started, get him in shape and get him to make some friends.'"


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