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Got A Vagina? Here's A Song Worth Listening To (For Your Vagina's Sake).

I've watched this about three times now, and started singing along.

Got A Vagina? Here's A Song Worth Listening To (For Your Vagina's Sake).

Heads up: This is a hip hop song about vaginas. If that's not the kind of thing that would fly in your place of employment (or the coffee shop you're currently staking out), consider the audio NSFW.

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Here's a breakdown of the music video.

To start us off, we've got comedian Nadia Kamil with some muppet backup dancers inside what appears to be a fake vagina. I repeat: inside a fake vagina.


Mary Wollstonecraft, by the way, was an 18th-century advocate for women's rights. She wrote about some suuuuuper controversial things, like the idea that women are actually NOT inferior to men. *GASP*. Get it, Mary.

So then we jump into some facts.

In other words, about half of U.S. women don't get regular pap screenings. Why is that such a big deal, you ask? Because of these facts:

So what did Nadia Kamil do to promote vaginal health? She live-tweeted the experience of getting her own very first pap smear. And then she sang about it. Seriously, what could be a better PSA than this?

Now she breaks it down for us and explains the process of a pap smear: "The nurse inserts the speculum / She's all up in your frill. / It takes 30 seconds, it ain't a thrill but it's fine."

Look, people, it's weird to show a stranger your vagina. But if you think about it, the doctor you're seeing has looked at so many vaginas before yours. Honestly, yours is probably nothing special, so it's really nothing to be nervous about.


"All you b**ches better book a smear. / With no fear / So you know that your cervix is clear / Of cancer."

In the end, Kamil's results came back, and she was cancer-free! She did have thrush, though — just a yeast infection. Which is totally normal, but also a good thing to be informed about. Here's to having ALL THE INFOS about your vagina.

So what's the bottom line here? It's that getting a pap smear is really NO BIG DEAL.

It's nothing to get worked up about, but it's definitely something to consider having done.

Want to check out Nadia Kamil's live-tweeted pap smear experience? Here are some highlights.

Or check out the whole experience via Storify.

And hey, before you go — we're not trying to say that everyone with a vagina must go get a pap smear right this moment. Nadia says this best herself: "If you don't want to get screened — of course that's fine too. Your body, your choices! I just hope fear of cost or embarrassment isn't a barrier to anyone who would like to get screened."

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