GoT's controversial 'lesson' on how rape can shape a person sparked a great conversation with fans.

*Spoiler Alert*

**Spoilers for Season 8 Episode 4 are below**

In Season 8 Episode 4 of "Game of Thrones," a long-awaited reunion between two characters took place. However, it left many fans reeling over a particular moment concerning Sansa's trajectory.

Sansa and Sandor Clegane, aka the Hound, hadn't seen each other since the Battle of the Blackwater all the way back in Season 2. Obviously a lot's happened to both of them in that time, but when Sansa joins the Hound in the dining hall, the focus falls to her and her "lost innocence."


The Hound remarks that when he first knew Sansa, she was too afraid to look him in the eye. She replies that she's seen much worse than him since then.

This is where it starts to get weird. The Hound digs into Sansa's canned reply by saying she's been "broken in hard," and even though she claps back by saying she gave Ramsey his by feeding him to his hounds, The Hound solidifies his case that she's different now by invoking his pet name for her.

Gif via HBO/tumblr

However, he is mostly sympathetic, saying if she'd come with him when he left King's Landing, he could've saved her from the horrors she's endured, specifically the horrible men who abused her repeatedly. Then she takes his hand and says, "Without Littlefinger and Ramsey and the rest, I would've stayed a Little Bird all my life."

For many fans, this was a major record scratch moment. To them, it sounded as if the writers were saying Sansa's the strong woman she is today BECAUSE of all the sexual abuse she lived through.

Some felt the scene must've been written by a man, because a woman would understand why it's imperative for trauma to be portrayed in a more mindful way.

Others thought the conclusion Sansa comes to is dangerous for young, impressionable minds because it's a major misrepresentation of what goes along with surviving trauma.

But there were also some people who felt everyone was blowing the scene's "message" way out of proportion.

Meanwhile, several abuse survivors think her stance, while oversimplified, is on point.

Is there a "correct" interpretation of Sansa's remarks about the abuse she survived? Of course not. However, actress Jessica Chastain, who worked with Sophie Turner (actress who portrays Sansa) on the upcoming "Dark Phoenix" movie made a pretty compelling argument for what's wrong with Sansa's character development culminating in this way.

Eloquent, to the point and also a nice plug for her upcoming flick.

But just because she's a star and her tweet went viral doesn't necessarily mean she's automatically right. All schools of thought on this divisive moment should be welcomed because conversations around tough issues like this ultimately help creative folks portray them better in future TV shows and films.

So what do you think about it?

More
Twitter / The Hollywood Reporter

Actress Michelle Williams earned a standing ovation for her acceptance speech at the 2019 Emmy Awards, both in the Microsoft Theater in L.A. and among viewers online.

As she accepted her first Emmy award for Lead Actress in a Limited Series/Movie for her role in FX's "Fosse/Verdon," she praised the studios who produced the show for supporting her in everything she needed for the role—including making sure she was paid equitably.

Keep Reading Show less
Culture
'Good Morning America'

Over 35 million people have donated their marrow worldwide, according to the World Marrow Donor Day, which took place September 21. That's 35,295,060 who've selflessly given a part of themselves so another person can have a shot at life. World Marrow Donor Day celebrates and thanks those millions of people who have donated cells for blood stem cells or marrow transplants. But how do you really say thank you to someone who saved your life?

Eighteen-year-old Jack Santos wasn't aware that he was sick."I was getting a lot of nosebleeds but I didn't really think I felt anything wrong," Jack told ABC news. During his yearly checkup, his bloodwork revealed that he had aplastic anemia, a rare non-cancerous blood disease in which there are not enough stem cells in the bone marrow for it to make new blood cells. There are 300 to 900 new cases of aplastic anemia in America each year. It is believed that aplastic anemia is an auto-immune disorder, but in 75% of cases, the cause of the disease is unknown.

It wasn't easy for his family to see him struggle with the illness. "I didn't want to see him go through something like this," Shelby, his older sister, said. "It was terrifying, but we were ready for whatever brought with it at the time."

Keep Reading Show less
Family

Someday, future Americans will look back on this era of school shootings in bafflement and disbelief—not only over the fact that it happened, but over how long it took us to enact significant legislation to try to stop it.

Five people die from vaping, and the government talks about banning vaping devices. Hundreds of American children have been shot to death in their classrooms, sometimes a dozen or so at a time, and the government has done practically nothing. It's unconscionable.

Keep Reading Show less
Education & Information

After over a hundred days protests and demonstrations over basic freedoms in Hong Kong, the city has been ground down both emotionally and economically. So, the government there is looking for leading PR firms to rehabilitate its somewhat authoritarian image with the rest of the world. Only one problem, they're all saying no.

Keep Reading Show less
Democracy