A queer musician shouted out an eatery's inclusive bathrooms. The response was delightful.

Ayesha Curry, a former actress and famed cookbook writer and restaurant owner, is a well-known Bay Area favorite.

As the host of "Ayesha's Homemade" on The Food Network, the author of "The Seasoned Life," and one of the collaborators behind International Smoke, she's a pretty busy woman.

Photo by Gustavo Caballero/Getty Images for NYCWFF.


She also happens to be married to basketball player Steph Curry. The powerhouse couple lead very public lives, and Ayesha has become increasingly cautious about what she says and when. But she didn't shy away from engaging with musician Kehlani after a recent Twitter shoutout.

Photo by Christopher Polk/Getty Images for iHeartMedia.

Kehlani, a queer musician, thanked Curry on Twitter for using the word "humans" to label the bathrooms in her restaurant instead of separating them by gender.

Curry's response? She did it herself.

In a tweet that's now been liked more than 14,000 times, Curry told Kehlani that she put those signs up herself, showing that Curry understands the importance of inclusion in public spaces.

Curry's actions may seem simply normal in the predominantly progressive area where she lives, but given her self-identification as a devout Christian, her actions actually speak to an important fact.

Curry makes it clear that being religious and being inclusive aren't mutually exclusive.

In spite of common rhetoric claiming that Christians aren't progressive and accepting of diverse identities, or the reverse — that Christians can't make space for the fluidity of gender and sexual identity — Curry proves you can in fact be both religious and tolerant.

Photo by Gustavo Caballero/Getty Images for SOBEWFF.

Curry is not alone: She joins a number of self-proclaimed religious people who are becoming more accepting in public. Magic Johnson frequently attends church and has been accepting and affirming of his son EJ's sexuality; Stephen Colbert, a devout Catholic, has consistently stood up for queer rights; and even some things the pope has said has signified a shift in how Christians view marriage equality.

These examples illustrate a pretty basic truth: It's totally possible to be a person of faith and also be accepting of queer people. It's really that simple.

via CNN / Twitter

Eviction seemed imminent for Dasha Kelly, 32, and her three young daughters Sharron, 8; Kia, 6; and Imani, 5, on Monday. The eviction moratorium expired over the weekend and it looked like there was no way for them to avoid becoming homeless.

The former Las Vegas card dealer lost her job due to casino closures during the pandemic and needed $2,000 to cover her back rent. The mother of three couldn't bear the thought of being put out of her apartment with three children in the scorching Nevada desert.

"I had no idea what we were going to do," Kelly said, according to KOAT.

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