A man asks online for volunteers to repaint an elder neighbor's home. He gets over 6,000 responses.

Teens. They often don't know how their words can hurt. And this is one such case ... but with a very happy ending.

Josh Cyganik has worked for Union Pacific Railroad across the street from the house below in Pendelton, Oregon, for years. One day while at work, he heard some mean words coming from nearby.


Image Josh Cyganik, used with permission.

Some snarky teens were commenting on the state of the home...

*dramatic re-enactment*

...all while the owner, Leonard Bullock, was sitting on the porch! I mean. Not cool. Someone send those kids to Mister Rogers' Neighborhood class please. (I wish this existed.)

As Josh told ABC News, he did not enjoy overhearing this nonsense.

"[The teenagers] said they need to burn it and tear it down and nobody deserves that ... I saw Leonard had his head down, and I felt bad for him. After a couple of days, I knew there was something I could do to help."

Josh had worked across the street, waving as he passed, for around four years, but his first convo with Leonard was right after hearing those teens.

And it went something like, "Mind if I paint your house?"

Leonard, being the good sport that he is, was totally into that. His friend agreed! Kindness given, kindness received badge UNLOCKED!

As Josh told ABC news, Leonard was excited! He "could hardly talk he was so ecstatic."

With the homeowner's enthusiastic permission to paint the home, it was time to get some help from the community!

Suddenly, the likes started rolling in. (This is also where I start to like Facebook for being such a great place for communities to come together.)

There are over 6,000 shares and counting on his original Facebook call for help.

And with comments like these:


And on the day Josh scheduled to paint, people started rolling in...

Image via Union Pacific, used with permission.

How'd it turn out?

GIF via Josh Cyganik's Facebook, used with permission.

That's what kindness looks like. Everyday kindness.

According to Josh what he did for Leonard is what anyone would do if given the chance: "According to the media, I'm a hero. I'm not a hero. I just heard something that bothered me. Anyone would have done the same thing. Everyone has it in their heart to do things like this."

Josh and Leonard. Image via Union Pacific.

Here's to seeing more of that every day.

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Macy's and Girls Inc. believe that all girls deserve to be safe, supported, and valued. However, racial disparities continue to exist for young people when it comes to education levels, employment, and opportunities for growth. Add to that the gender divide, and it's clear to see why it's important for girls of color to have access to mentors who can equip them with the tools needed to navigate gender, economic, and social barriers.

Anissa Rivera is one of those mentors. Rivera is a recent Program Manager at the Long Island affiliate of Girls Inc., a nonprofit focusing on the holistic development of girls ages 5-18. The goal of the organization is to provide a safe space for girls to develop long-lasting mentoring relationships and build the skills, knowledge, and attitudes to thrive now and as adults.

Rivera spent years of her career working within the themes of self and community empowerment with young people — encouraging them to tap into their full potential. Her passion for youth development and female empowerment eventually led her to Girls Inc., where she served as an agent of positive change helping to inspire all girls to be strong, smart, and bold.

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Inspiring young women from all backgrounds is why Macy's has continued to partner with Girls Inc. for the second year in a row. The partnership will support mentoring programming that offers girls career readiness, college preparation, financial literacy, and more. Last year, Macy's raised over $1.3M for Girls Inc. in support of this program along with their Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) programming for more than 26,000 girls. Studies show that girls who participated are more likely than their peers to enjoy math and science, score higher on standardized math tests, and be more equipped for college and campus life.

Thanks to mentors like Rivera, girls across the country have the tools they need to excel in school and the confidence to change the world. With your help, we can give even more girls the opportunity to rise up. Throughout September 2021, customers can round up their in-store purchases or donate online to support Girls Inc. at Macys.com/MacysGives.

Who runs the world? Girls!

via 2C2K Photography / Flickr

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This development is fantastic news for diabetics because it will make it a lot easier for them to store this life-saving medication. The product labels from all three of America's insulin manufacturers state that insulin should be stored in a refrigerator at approximately 36°F to 46°F.

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Did you know that girls who are encouraged to discover and develop their strengths tend to be more likely to achieve their goals? It's true. The question, however, is how to encourage girls to develop self-confidence and grow up healthy, educated, and independent.

The answer lies in Girls Inc., a national nonprofit serving girls ages 5-18 in more than 350 cities across North America. Since first forming in 1864 to serve girls and young women who were experiencing upheaval in the aftermath of the Civil War, they've been on a mission to inspire girls to kick butt and step into leadership roles — today and in the future.

This is why Macy's has committed to partnering with Girls Inc. and making it easy to support their mission. In a national campaign running throughout September 2021, customers can round up their in-store purchases to the nearest dollar or donate online to support Girls Inc. and empower girls throughout the country.


Kaylin St. Victor, a senior at Brentwood High School in New York, is one of those girls. She became involved in the Long Island affiliate of Girls Inc. when she was in 9th grade, quickly becoming a role model for her peers.

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Within her first year in the organization, she bravely took on speaking opportunities and participated in several summer programs focused on advocacy, leadership, and STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). "The women that I met each have a story that inspires me to become a better person than I was yesterday," said St. Victor. She credits her time at Girls Inc. with making her stronger and more comfortable in her own skin — confidence that directly translates to high achievement in education and the workforce.

In 2020, Macy's helped raise $1.3 million in support of their STEM and college and career readiness programming for more than 26,000 girls. In fact, according to a recent study, Girls Inc. girls are significantly more likely than their peers to enjoy math and science, to be interested in STEM careers, and to perform better on standardized math tests.

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