A former anti-vaxxer just admitted she was wrong. Now some enraged parents are coming after her.

Pennsylvanian mom Abbey Clint grew up in a household that didn't believe in vaccinations or any other type of medicine a doctor might recommend for that matter.

For example, there wasn't anything for pain management in the house that wasn't "all-natural." Clint believes the avoidance of traditional medicine originated from her mother's intense distrust of doctors.

"I am thankful that I don’t need to be an expert on vaccines in order to be a mom and make common sense decisions for my family," Clint told Upworthy. "It’s easy to get drawn into the emotional rhetoric of the antivaxx theories, but their whole pile of evidence is predicated upon a conspiracy theory that doesn’t hold water."


So, unsurprisingly, Clint grew into an adult with similar views. When she and her husband were discussing having kids, keeping vaccines out of the picture was originally part of the plan.

But then she started talking about vaccination with her mother-in-law who had rubella — a contagious disease that can cause lifelong side effects if a pregnant woman catches it and passes it along to her unborn child.

"What if I caught it? What if my baby caught it in my womb?" she told Buzzfeed. "It’s preventable. That’s what’s shocking to me now."

So she researched and talked to a doctor she trusted, and eventually getting vaccinated just made the most logical sense.

Clint not only got herself up to date with all the CDC-recommended vaccinations, she's making sure her daughters are also inoculated per the age schedule.

"On both sides of the isle, anti and pro vaccines, people are motivated by one thing, the love of their vulnerable children," she told Upworthy. "I realized that the scientists and experts behind these vaccines are people just like me, with families of their own, so they too must be passionately motivated by the love of their children and vulnerable adults."

"It became clear to me that the only other possible explanation that supports the anti-vaxx position is ludicrous: that thousands of doctors, scientists, and experts in many unrelated fields are somehow conspiring to harm their own children and their own families. Once that conspiracy bubble was popped, I had no problem trusting my doctor’s recommendation about vaccination."

But she hasn't stopped there. Considering the unprecedented number of measles outbreaks this year, Clint decided she'd do what she could to convert other parents who might be hesitant about getting their kids vaccinated for whatever reason.

So she created a Facebook post showing her kids getting vaccinated alongside an infographic that dispels a lot of the misinformation around vaccines that's out there.

The infographic notes the lack of scientific evidence there is linking vaccines and autism. It also outlines the many risks that come with the diseases vaccines are designed to prevent.

"Glad my babies don’t need to suffer through preventable infectious diseases. Preventative maintenance saves co-pays and saves lives. Proud to vaccinate!" she wrote in her post.

The post garnered a ton of attention, especially from local parents. Clint is connected to many anti-vaxxer parents on social media, and knew her post was going to ruffle some feathers, but that was partly the point.

It was shared in pro-vaccine and anti-vaccine Facebook groups alike. She had parents praising her for spreading the healthy message and parents berating her, saying she's putting her own children at risk. Obviously, it's a divisive issue, but the fact that many friends messaged her privately asking specific questions about getting their children vaccinate shows there's hope for more converts in her community.

Changing what you've believed for so long is no easy task. For Clint, it was a gradual process that she committed to because she knew it would ultimately keep her children, as well as the people around them, healthier.

If you've been on the fence about vaccination, the best thing you can do is speak to a doctor you trust who can give you all the genuine facts about it. It's easy to follow suit with friends and family because you don't want to be the odd person out, but if being that person will protect your family from preventable illness, it's more than worth it.

Family
"Why is Dad So Mad"

Army veteran Seth Kastle had everything going for him when he came home from serving 16 years overseas. That's why it was so confusing to him when his life began to fall apart.

He had a job, a loving wife, family, and friends. He knew things would be different when he moved back to Kansas, but he didn't think they'd be that different. But he felt an extreme anger building up inside, a fire inside his chest that he couldn't explain or get rid of.

Kastle was unknowingly suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), an anxiety disorder that can develop after experiencing or witnessing a traumatic event — like war.

Keep Reading Show less
Family
True
Verizon

If you're a Game of Thrones fan, then Gwendoline Christie aka Brienne of Tarth needs no introduction. While there was disappointment surrounding the finale, and the last season in general, Christie's character was one of the few to remain near and dear to the hearts of fans throughout it all.

Fans wept when they finally witnessed Ser Brienne of Tarth get knighted after six seasons of being one of the most honorable and integrity filled characters to grace the Game of Thrones screen.

Similarly, Brienne of Tarth's final tribute to Jaime Lannister left people both misty-eyed and eager to dedicate countless memes to the moment.

Keep Reading Show less
Culture

When Lily Evans set out to walk her dog, she had no idea the story of that walk would later go viral on the internet.

When she took to Twitter to recount her experience, she opened with a simple question, one that many men have probably wondered for a long time — though women already know the answer.

(Before you click through to the thread itself, note that Lily's Twitter account is expressly for adults and may be NSFW.)

Keep Reading Show less
More
Youtube

Flowers are a great way to express your feelings for someone. Red roses say, "I love you," but a whole garden of pink flowers screams it. One husband took the romantic gesture of getting your wife flowers to the next level.

Mr. and Mrs. Kuroki got married in 1956, and Mrs. Kuroki joined her husband on his dairy farm in Shintomi, Japan, The Telegraph reports. The couple lived a full life and had two kids. After 30 years of marriage, the couple planned on retiring and traveling around Japan, but those plans were soon dashed.

When she was 52, Mrs. Kuroki lost her vision due to complications from diabetes. Her blindness hit her hard, and she began staying inside all day. Mr. Kuroki knew his wife was depressed and wanted to do something to cheer her up.

Mr. Kuroki noticed some people stopping to admire his small garden of pink shibazakura flowers (also known as moss phlox) and got an idea. He couldn't take his wife to see the world, so he had to make the world come to his wife.

Keep Reading Show less
Family